Old Lady Mary: A Story of the Seen and the Unseen (Google eBook)

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Roberts Brothers, 1884 - 134 pages
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Page 112 - She was used to it by this time ; but to be nothing is hard, even when you are accustomed to it ; and though she knew that they would not hear her, what could she do but cry out to them as she stood there unregarded ? " Oh, have pity upon me ! " Lady Mary said ; and the pang in her heart was so great that the very atmosphere was stirred, and the air could scarcely contain her and the passion of her endeavor to make herself known, but thrilled like a harp-string to her cry. Mrs. Bowyer heard the jar...
Page 36 - You have guessed rightly," he said, "quite right. That is one of the words with a false meaning, which is to us a mere symbol of something we cannot understand. But you see what it means now." It was a great shock, it need not be concealed. Otherwise, she had been quite pleasantly occupied with the interest of something new, into which she had walked so easily out of her own bedchamber, without any trouble, and with the delightful new sensation of health and strength. But when it flashed upon her...
Page 67 - I've known a many, as could not abide to see a gloomy face,' said the housekeeper. 'She kept us all comfortable for the sake of being comfortable herself, but no more.' 'Oh, you are hard upon my lady!' cried Jervis, 'and I can't bear to hear a word against her, though it's been an awful disappointment to me.' 'What's you or me, or any one...
Page 25 - Jervis came back; but there, was no connection in Jervis's mind, then or ever after, between the paper she had signed and this old cabinet, which was one of the old lady's toys. She arranged Lady Mary's shawl, which had dropped off her shoulders a little in her unusual activity, and took- up her book and her favorite cushion, and all the little paraphernalia that moved with her, and gave her lady her arm to go down-stairs ; where little Mary had placed her chair just at the right angle, and arranged...
Page 120 - The servants, who all wanted to leave, and the villagers, who avoided the grounds after nightfall, spread the rumour far and near that the house was haunted. XI In the meantime Connie herself was silent, and said no more of the Lady. Her attachment to Mary grew into one of those visionary passions which little girls so often form for young women. She followed her so-called governess wherever she went, hanging upon her arm when she could, holding her dress when no other hold was possible - following...
Page 97 - it is one of the old Miss Murchisons, who are always so fond of finding out about their neighbors. I have no doubt at all on that subject. She wants to find you out in your pet naughtiness, whatever it is, and tell me." " I am sure it is not for that," cried Connie. " Oh, how can you be so disagreeable ? I know she is not a lady who would tell. Besides, she is not thinking at all about me. She was either looking for something she had lost, or, oh, I don't know what it was ! and when she...
Page 41 - Lady Mary had a consciousness, which was pleasant to her, that so far as the hosen and shoon went, she had abundant means of preparing herself for the pricks of any road, however rough; but she had no time to indulge this pleasing reflection, for she was shortly introduced into a great building full of innumerable rooms, in one of which her companion left her. IV The door opened, and she felt herself free to come out. How long she had been there, or what passed there, is not for any one to say. She...
Page 84 - will you come back with me and speak to the child?' At this Mary faltered a little. 'I have never been there since the - funeral,' she said. The good woman laid a kind hand upon her shoulder, caressing and soothing. 'You were very fond of her - in spite of the way she has used you?' 'Oh, how dare you, or any one, to speak of her so? She used me as if I had been her dearest child. She was more kind to me than a mother. There is no one in the world like her!' Mary cried. 'And yet she left you without...
Page 100 - could anything show better that it is a mere delusion? Why, in the name of all that is reasonable, should this stranger child see her, if it was anything, and not you?' Mrs Turner looked from one to another with wondering eyes. 'You know what it is?' she said. 'Oh, you know who it is? Doctor, doctor, is it because my Connie is so delicate? is it a warning? is it ?' 'Oh, for heaven's sake! you will drive me mad, you ladies. Is it this, and is it that? It is nothing, I tell you. The child is out...
Page 117 - Yes, Miss Mary, dear, I allow that she is very nice to you; but who could help that? and to hear my lady's name - that might have her faults, but who was far above anything of the sort - in every mouth, and her costoome, that they don't know how to describe, and to think that she would go and talk to the like of Betsy Barnes about what is on her mind! I think sometimes I shall break my heart, or else throw up my place, Miss Mary,' Prentiss said, with tears. 'Oh, don't do that; oh, don't leave me,...

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