Journal of a Tour in the Levant, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Murray, 1820 - Middle East
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 145 - When ye are saluted with a salutation, salute the person with a better salutation, or at least return the same; for God taketh an account of all things; God!
Page 49 - ... prospect. On my way my guide complained bitterly of the tyranny of the government, who exacted from each cottager 150 piastres yearly. When we came to the antique he had boasted of, I found it was a small Venetian building, on which I left it immediately, and he led me to the site of the ancient Idalium, which is about a quarter of a mile to the north of the village, between two small mountains, part of which it covered : here, he said, according to a tradition in the village, stood a large city...
Page 199 - Turks, and of the happy ones who had secured a place there, exerted in curses, blows, kicks, $'c., could drive them. At length, at twenty minutes past two, the fire was given from the window, and was received with a tremendous and universal shout through the whole church. On its first appearance, the torch was seized by a boy near the window, who rubbed it against his face, head, and neck, with such vehemence as to extinguish it; for which he was well beaten by those near him. Eight different times...
Page 200 - ... received with a tremendous and universal shout through the whole church. On its first appearance, the torch was seized by a boy near the window, who rubbed it against his face, head, and neck, with such vehemence as to extinguish it; for which he was well beaten by those near him. Eight different times was the fire given from the window, and as every pilgrim carried candles in his hand (in bunches, some of four, some of six, some of eight, some of twelve, and some a single one, according to their...
Page 577 - The effects of this are seen everywhere throughout the island, for a Greek, as he seldom possesses power, becomes immediately intoxicated by it when given him, and from a contemptible sycophant is changed instantaneously to a rapacious tyrant. Accordingly the peasants of Cyprus, both Mahometans and Greeks not a single Jew is allowed to live in the island are so insufferably plundered that their labour is barely capable of supporting their existence, and they yearly desert in great numbers...
Page 580 - Caramania, from the hot sirocs of Syria, and from the plague of Egypt, which never fails to infect it when prevalent there. The transit commerce of Cyprus is considerable, owing to the numerous vessels that come from other ports of the Levant, and from Malta. But this is only within a few years ; Signor Vondiziano tells me that the average of the consular duties in Larnaca for the last four years...
Page 197 - What a scene was before me ! The Greek and Armenian galleries overlooking the dome were filled with female pilgrims of those nations enthusiastically looking towards the Sepulchre, and crossing themselves. Below me, the whole church, and particularly the circular apartment containing the dome, was absolutely crammed with pilgrims, men and women, hallooing, shouting, singing, and violently struggling to be near the Sepulchre, while the Turkish soldiers were driving them back with their whips. One...
Page 35 - The burying-ground is now, however, falling to decay, as the Greeks also are interred there, and many masons have been working on the tombs, by which they have quite effaced the inscriptions of the flat ones. The Marina consists of warehouses, and a few houses and huts, in which live some merchants, Europeans and Greeks, porters and boatmen.
Page 199 - I was inclined to think that the fire was phosphoric, as the priests declare that it will not burn a person ; but on seeing it, I found it was common fire, and that the fable of its not burning is only believed by enthusiasts. At two o'clock the governor entered, preceded...
Page 564 - ... bridge, yet entire. We passed three or four of these bridges in the valleys near Kikkos, but all in ruins. The villages which we passed in four hours of this afternoon's ride were Colona, Akhelia, Timee, and Manthria. At seven we stopped at the village of Coukklia, which is built on the site of Old Paphos, and found good accommodations in a large ruined house, of which the master, an intelligent Greek, received us very hospitably. He told us that Coukklia, with six other villages, was a farm...

Bibliographic information