Autobiography, Poor Richard, and later writings: letters from London, 1757-1775, Paris, 1776-1785, Philadelphia, 1785-1790, Poor Richard's almanack, 1733-1758, the autobiography

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Library of America, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 816 pages
7 Reviews
"Writing has been of Great Use to me in the Course of my Life," Benjamin Franklin said in his famous Autobiography. With characteristically calculated understatement, he attributed his enormous and varied successesto "my having learnt a little to scribble." This collection of Franklin's works begins with letters sent from London (1757-1775) describing the events and diplomacy preceding the Revolutionary War. The volume also contains political satires, bagatelles,pamphlets, and letters written in Paris (1776-1785) , where he represented the revolutionary United States at the court of Louis XVI, as well as his speeches given in the Constitutional Convention and other works written in Philadelphia (1785-1790), including his last published article, a searing satire against slavery. Also included are the delightfully shrewd prefaces to Poor Richard's Almanack (1733-1758) and their worldly, pungent maxims that have entered our American culture. Finally, the classic Autobiography, Franklin's last word on his greatest literary creation-his own invented personality-is presented here in a new edition, completely faithful to Franklin's manuscript.

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Benjamin Franklin: Autobiography, Poor Richard, and Later Writings; The Autobiography

User Review  - Staff - Book Verdict

Benjamin Franklin set the tone for more than a century of positive-thinking American literature with this inspiring 1791 account of his education and early career as a printer, inventor, and diplomat. Read full review

Review: Autobiography, Poor Richard, and Later Writings (Library of America: Benjamin Franklin #2)

User Review  - James Violand - Goodreads

A huge ego, but a very likable man. One of the Founding Fathers, Franklin's wit and wisdom propelled him upon the world scene. Very enjoyable. Read full review

Contents

LETTERS
9
Jane Mecom September 16 1758
16
Jane Mecom January 9 1760
24
Copyright

44 other sections not shown

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About the author (1997)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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