Police pictures: the photograph as evidence

Front Cover
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1997 - Art - 132 pages
2 Reviews
The mug shot, the scene of the crime, photographic evidence - all of these are predicated on the belief that the photograph shows the truth, unvarnished and indisputable. But does it? In a remarkable survey of over 120 images from public and private sources, Police Pictures questions the conjunction of photography and enforcement and challenges the ability of image to represent the truth. From haunting photographs of the Lincoln conspirators to Weegee's sordid murder victims and the prisoner portraits taken by the Khmer Rouge, Police Pictures explores the policing function of photography - and the controversial manipulations of images by and for the forces of authority - in a catalogue of the power of the law and the lens.

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Review: Police Pictures

User Review  - Love - Goodreads

I have seen most of thses in the past. But it was still an interesting read on the photography. Read full review

Review: Police Pictures

User Review  - Lenny - Goodreads

Excellent source for looking at interesting/disturbing images of police related incidents. Read full review

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Contents

LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION
6
IDENTIFYING THE CRIMINAL
29
AND SO THE MOVING TRIGGER FINGER WRITES
41
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Sandra Phillips lives in LaHabra Heights, CA. She is a TV personality and expert home economist with eight children. She owns InHome Vations-a maintenance-free design building company.

Mark Haworth-Booth is visiting professor of photography, University of the Arts, London, and honorary research fellow at the Victoria & Albert Museum, where he was curator of photographs for thirty-five years. He is the author of numerous books including "Photography: An Independent Art" (1997).

Squiers is an art critic.