Women's Writing in Nineteenth-Century France

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 10, 2000 - Literary Criticism - 316 pages
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This is the most complete critical survey to date of women's literature in nineteenth-century France. Alison Finch's wide-ranging analysis of some 60 writers reflects the rich diversity of a century that begins with Mme de StaŽl's cosmopolitanism and ends with Rachilde's perverse eroticism. Finch's study brings out the contribution not only of major figures like George Sand but also of many other talented and important writers who have been unjustly rejected, including Flora Tristan, Claire de Duras and Delphine de Girardin. Her account opens new perspectives on the interchange between male and female authors and on women's literary traditions during the period. She discusses popular and serious writing: fiction, verse, drama, memoirs, journalism, feminist polemic, historiography, travelogues, children's tales, religious and political thought - often brave, innovative texts linked to women's social and legal status in an oppressive society. Extensive reference features include bibliographical guides to texts and writers.
  

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Contents

Conditions for women writers
8
Overview 18001829
21
Henriette de La Tour du Pin
32
Sophie Cottin
41
Claire de Duras
51
The invisible women of French theatre
62
Overview 18301869
79
Amable Tastu and
94
Overview 18701899
163
Naturalism Symbolism and Marie Krysinska
184
Louise Michel
195
Rachilde and the horror of gender confusion
206
England
219
Legacies
226
APPENDIX
235
APPENDIX
249

the
107
Flora Tristan and Leonie dAunet
118
Delphine de Girardin
130
Marceline
139
Women and politics
150
Notes
263
Bibliography
299
Index
309
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