The Canon of Scripture

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InterVarsity Press, Oct 31, 1988 - Religion - 349 pages
32 Reviews
Winner of two 1990 Christianity Today Awards: Readers' Choice (1st place; theology & doctrine) and Critics' Choice (1st place; theology & doctrine). A 1989 ECPA Gold Medallion Award winner! How did the books of the Bible come to be recognized as Holy Scripture? Who decided what shape the canon should take? What criteria influenced these decisions? After nearly nineteen centuries the canon of Scripture still remains an issue of debate. Protestants, Catholics and the Orthodox all have slightly differing collections of documents in their Bibles. Martin Luther, one of the early leaders of the Reformation, questioned the inclusion of the book of James in the canon. And many Christians today, while confessing the authority of all of Scripture, tend to rely on only a few books and particular themes while ignoring the rest. Scholars have raised many other questions as well. Research into second-century Gnostic texts have led some to argue that politics played a significant role in the formation of the Christian canon. Assessing the influence of ancient communities and a variety of disputes on the final shaping of the canon call for ongoing study. In this significant historical study, F. F. Bruce brings the wisdom of a lifetime of reflection and biblical interpretation to bear in answering the questions and clearing away the confusion surrounding the Christian canon of Scripture. Adept in both Old and New Testament studies, he brings a rare comprehensive perspective to his task. Though some issues have shifted since the original publication of this book, it still remains a significant landmark and touchstone for further studies.

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Another respected teacher, who disrespects God's words.
God gives us a stern warning not to add or take away from His words, calling those who tamper with His words accursed. If you do a comparison
between the different "Bible" versions, you will find that they are not all made equal. I wouldn't ask you to simply trust in me, but to do further research and find out for yourself. The King James Bible uses the Masoretic Text of the Hebrews for the Old Testament, and the Antiochan Greek text for the New Testament. Most modern alternatives to the Bible have a foundation built on the Samaritan Torah/Pentateuch and the Westcott and Hort (of the Ghostly Guild) Greek Text. This Westcott and Hort Greek text is also the underlying text used by the Jehovah's Witness Bible, the New World Translation (NWT). Alexandria, was the epicenter so to speak for gnosticism in the ancient world, and what came out of it was the Septuagint (LXX). The Septuagint (LXX) has been highly regarded unfortunately in many colleges and seminaries, I've attended two of them. These teachers were nice men, but unfortunately compromised and went the way of Baalam when it came to protecting the Word of God. When it comes to choosing between fearing God and men, fear God. God's words are a lamp unto our feet and a light unto our path. His words endure forever. We live by every word which proceeds out of the mouth of God.
http://www.kingjamesvideoministries.com/NIVOmissions.pdf
 

Review: Canon of Scripture

User Review  - Tom - Goodreads

This book should be read by every Christian. It will be faith building in understanding how we got the Bible and criteria by which some books were canonized and others were not. As time goes by, this ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
9
Abbreviations
11
INTRODUCTION
15
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

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