But Didn't We Have Fun?: An Informal History of Baseball's Pioneer Era, 1843-1870

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Ivan R. Dee, Jan 1, 2008 - Sports & Recreation - 286 pages
8 Reviews
The story of baseball in America begins not with the fabled Abner Doubleday but with a generation of mid-nineteenth-century Americans who moved from the countryside to the cities and brought a cherished but delightfully informal game with them.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Big_Bang_Gorilla - LibraryThing

Being an "informal history" of baseball's very early days. Morris' thesis is that historians have underestimated the fun quotient in their accounts of early baseball. His approach pays very little ... Read full review

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As a reader with more knowledge than the average base ball fan of modern times, I found that this book was written very well. It dives into more than just the evolution of our great American Pastime, but also illustrates the culture in America during base ball's earliest days. The writing is very good, telling facts and other pieces of information in a very reader-friendly format. This book was a joy to read, and will always be one of my favorites.  

Contents

Introduction
3
Before the Knickerbockers
11
The Knickerbockers Game Becomes the New York Game
26
Copyright

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