A Brief Account of Some of the Most Important Proceedings in Parliament, Relative to the Defects in the Administration of Justice in the Court of Chancery, the House of Lords, and the Court of Commissioners of Bankrupt: Together with the Opinions of Different Statesmen and Lawyers, as to the Remedies to be Applied (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1828 - Justice, Administration of - 436 pages
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Page i - A brief account of some of the most important proceedings in Parliament relative to the defects in the administration of justice in the Court of Chancery, the House of Lords and the Court of Commissioners of Bankrupts.
Page 119 - Ellis, remained in my hands pending the completion of the first three volumes ; and was ultimately, for reasons with which it is not necessary to trouble the reader, committed entirely to my charge. In carrying it through the press, I felt myself at liberty to make whatever alterations I pleased ; and therefore, if any errors remain, I must consider myself answerable for them. The task of translating the remainder was entrusted to Mr. Francis...
Page 87 - Anne, in 1703, and who was the great grandfather of the present master, it was ordered that it should be referred to one of the masters of the court, to take an account of the...
Page 2 - When More some years had chancellor been, No more suits did remain ; The same shall never more be seen, Till More be there again.
Page 336 - Brief Account of some of the most Important Proceedings in Parliament relative to the Defects in the Administration of Justice in the Court of Chancery, The House of Lords, and the Court of Commissioners of Bankrupts : Together with the Opinions of Different Statesmen and Lawyers as to the Remedies to be Applied.
Page 17 - His decrees were very few, in comparison to the many causes that came under discussion in that court in his time. The hearings, re-hearings, references to masters, reports and exceptions to those reports, exorbitant fees to Counsel and the length of time to which every cause was protracted, made the suitors weary and glad to submit to any decree suggested and agreed upon by their Counsel, in which neither party could complain of being aggrieved by the judge of the court.
Page 328 - Money to be paid into the Bank of England in the Name of the Accountant General of the Court of Exchequer.
Page 52 - ... crown the opportunity of finding for them an adequate and suitable reward. For his own part, he could not see any objection to the union of the two characters in the same individual, especially as they were far, very far from being inconsistent with each other. When the advocates for their separation told him that they saw a great objection to the making a political character a judge, he was inclined to ask them, what the situation of the country would be, supposing that there were placed at...
Page 361 - The necessity for the attendance of themselves, or their clerks, hefore the Masters in Chancery is not less urgent, as their neglect of this duty would occasion great pecuniary and other losses to their clients, which they would be compelled to make good by the verdict of a Court of Law, or the decree of a Court of Equity. The majority of solicitors have not more than one or two clerks to assist them in carrying on their business, nor can they afford to increase the number. The present practice seems...
Page 34 - Committee of the House of Commons, appointed to inquire into the Bankrupt Laws ; and i This and the two preceding motions were lost by large majorities.

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