The life of William Penn: the settler of Pennsylvania, the founder of Philadelphia, and one of the first lawgivers in the colonies, now United States, in 1682 (Google eBook)

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U. Hunt, 1836 - 208 pages
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Page 127 - He looks and laughs at a' that. A prince can mak' a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that ; But an honest man's aboon his might — Guid faith, he mauna fa' that ! For a
Page 123 - But his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob...
Page 143 - All fame is foreign but of true desert, Plays round the head, but comes not to the heart: One self-approving hour whole years outweighs Of stupid starers and of loud huzzas; And more true joy Marcellus exiled feels, Than Caesar with a senate at his heels. In parts superior what advantage lies? Tell (for you can) what is it to be wise ? 'Tis but to know how little can be known, To see all others...
Page 218 - ... the lives yourselves you would have the people live; and then you have right and boldness to punish the transgressor. Keep upon the square, for God sees you; therefore do your duty; and be sure you see with your own eyes, and hear with your own ears. Entertain no lurchers; cherish no informers for gain or revenge; use no tricks, fly to no devices to support or cover injustice, but let your hearts be upright before the Lord, trusting in Him above the contrivances of men, and none shall be able...
Page 107 - Son William, if you and your friends keep to your plain way of preaching, and keep to your plain way of living, you will make an end of the priests to the end of the world.
Page 215 - And if you change your condition and marry, choose with the knowledge and consent of your mother, if living, guardians, or those that have the charge of you. Mind neither beauty nor riches, but the fear of the Lord and a sweet and amiable disposition, such as you can love above all this world and that may make your habitations pleasant and desirable to you. And being married, be tender, affectionate, and patient, and meek.
Page 210 - Thirdly : Cast up thy income, and see what it daily amounts to ; by which thou mayest be sure to have it in thy sight and power to keep within compass : and I beseech thee to live low and sparingly, till my debts are paid ; and then enlarge as thou seest it convenient.
Page 216 - Know •well your incomings, and your outgoings may be better regulated. Love not money nor the world; use them only, and they will serve you; but if you love them, you serve them; which will debase your spirits, as well as offend the Lord. Pity the distressed, and hold out a hand of help to them; it may be your case: and as you mete to others, God will mete to you again. Be humble and gentle in your...
Page 107 - Son William, I am weary of the world ; I would not live over my days again, if I could command them with a wish ; for the snares of life are greater than the fears of death.
Page 218 - God, loving the people and hating covetousness. Let justice have its impartial course, and the law free passage. Though to your loss, protect no man against it ; for you are not above the law, but the law above you. Live therefore the lives yourselves you would have the people live, and then you have right and boldness to punish the transgressor. Keep upon the square, for God sees you : therefore do your duty, and be sure you see with your own eyes, and hear with your own ears.

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