Lyrical Ballads: With a Few Other Poems (Google eBook)

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J. & A. Arch, 1798 - 210 pages
46 Reviews
  

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Review: Lyrical Ballads

User Review  - Ahmet Uçar - Goodreads

not in its entirety, but i have read portions of it while i was studying English literature. Coleridge is profounder a man, yet he was under the umbra of Wordsworth's prolific writing. Read full review

Review: Lyrical Ballads

User Review  - Nicholas Seders - Goodreads

I picked this up after reading "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" - which I thoroughly enjoyed, and still consider my favorite poem in the collection. This book is truly a classic poetry publication ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
53
III
59
IV
63
V
69
VI
85
VII
95
VIII
98
XIII
133
XIV
139
XV
141
XVI
149
XVII
180
XVIII
183
XIX
186
XX
189

IX
105
X
110
XI
115
XII
117
XXI
193
XXII
197
XXIII
201

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Page 111 - Sisters and brothers, little maid, How many may you be?" "How many? Seven in all," she said, And wondering looked at me. "And where are they? I pray you tell.
Page 210 - And these my exhortations ! Nor, perchance, If I should be, where I no more can hear Thy voice, nor catch from thy wild eyes these gleams Of past existence, wilt thou then forget That on the banks of this delightful stream We stood together ; and that I, so long A worshipper of Nature, hither came, Unwearied in that service : rather say With warmer love, oh ! with far deeper zeal Of holier love.
Page 7 - The bride hath paced into the hall, Red as a rose is she; Nodding their heads before her goes The merry minstrelsy.
Page 205 - The picture of the mind revives again ; While here I stand, not only with the sense Of present pleasure, but with pleasing thoughts That in this moment there is life and food For future years.
Page 202 - That on a wild, secluded scene impress Thoughts of more deep seclusion, and connect The landscape with the quiet of the sky.
Page 35 - Still as a slave before his lord, The ocean hath no blast; His great bright eye most silently Up to the Moon is cast— If he may know which way to go; For she guides him smooth or grim. See, brother, see! how graciously She looketh down on him.
Page 112 - Then did the little maid reply, " Seven boys and girls are we ; Two of us in the churchyard lie, Beneath the churchyard tree." "You run about, my little maid, Your limbs they are alive; If two are in the churchyard laid, Then ye are only five." "Their graves are green, they may be seen," The little maid replied, " Twelve steps or more from my mother's door, And they are side by side.
Page 203 - But oft. in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them, In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart ; And passing even into my purer mind With tranquil restoration...
Page 210 - When these wild ecstasies shall be matured Into a sober pleasure; when thy mind Shall be a mansion for all lovely forms, Thy memory be as a dwelling-place For all sweet sounds and harmonies; oh! then, If solitude, or fear, or pain, or grief. Should be thy portion, with what healing thoughts Of tender joy wilt thou remember me, And these my exhortations'.
Page 206 - What then I was. The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.

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