The place, the man and the book (Google eBook)

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The H.W. Wilson company, 1916 - Books and reading - 16 pages
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Page 10 - Captain of the Book Ship." Their stories of wrecks and dangers and hairbreadth escapes were absorbing. Their whims, beliefs and bits of unexpected lore of the heavens above, the earth beneath, and the waters under the earth, were delightful and surprising.
Page 12 - Cap'n, I caught a coast guard and brung him in." Cap'n Jed was the president of the library board and general adviser plenipotentiary to the town. His speech was something like this. "Gentlemen and all the rest of you and the ladies : It seems to me that the Cap'n here's got her ship purty well in trim for a trial run ; and if all on board is agreeable let's push her off with three cheers for the Cap'n, her ship and her freight 'er meanin
Page 17 - You think we are going to let the Cap'n's book not be read jes' as many times as any uv of the books." I think, however, they had caught a taste of it themselves, because they had dubbed one of their number "Bre'r Fox," "'Cause he wux so smart actin' an' was always gittin' left." "Our mutual friend" Cap'n Jed had read first, and he had forced It on his friends just like he did the 'Cap'n's book." I was hopeful, however, when I found that they had really read it, because you can lead a horse to water...
Page 19 - Seven men on a dead man's chest" with a gusto and effect rather gruesomely realistic. Their view of Scott's "Talisman," was most Interesting; to a man almost those who read It disliked Edith Plantagenet and Berengaria, and frankly acknowledged to skipping the parts about them if they could. "They was always making trouble, going mooning around, dropping rosebuds, and taking a man away from where he ought to be." They liked Saladin best of all the men. "By jiminy, he cut a veil in two while It was...
Page 20 - They was always making trouble, going mooning around, dropping rosebuds, and taking a man away from where he ought to be." They liked Sa19 ladin best of all the men. "By jiminy, he cut a veil in two while it was er floatin' in the air. Anybody cud chop with an axe.
Page 14 - ... two and one half hours by rail, as the only train must go up the bay to cross and down again. So the arrangement was made that when I wanted to leave the little mainland town I was to get the captain of the life saving station on that side to signal across. On the given day the clouds began to hang low on the horizon and the sea to turn a cold gray and give that little ceaseless moan that presages a storm. They told me not to try it, but I had promised; so we ran up the signals and across came...
Page 7 - The little village so cut off has to b a world unto Itself for six months. On one side of It the ocean roars, storms and pounds, black and threatening; on the other, not a hundred yards from high tide level on the ocean side, the waters of the bay surge, following the ocean's every whim. The winter wind blows across the unprotected land with augmented fury, piles the clean white sand in great hummocks, rattles and rustles the dry sedge grass, which adds its moan of protest to the bleak sounds....
Page 15 - Stories from Wagner," Stevenson's "Treasure Island," Scott's "Talisman," Ball's "Star-land." The order of their popularity was as they are listed. The popularity of Repplier's book was accounted for partly by the fact that in every book that could be possibly connected...
Page 19 - Lohengrin" and the "Mastersingers of Neuremburg" appealed to them not at all. Stevenson's "Treasure island" would have stood higher in the list if the first readers had not held it so long for re-reading, for, "Sailor tales and sailor tunes, Storm, adventures, heat and cold, Schooners, islands and maroons, Buccaneers and buried gold, Pleased them as they pleased the child of old." They sang for me, "Seven men on a dead man's chest" with a gusto and effect rather gruesomely realistic.
Page 20 - ... with an axe." (Alas for Richard Coeur de Lion.) It seemed to me that this dislike of theirs for Scott's women was a rare criticism of these rather wax-like heroines. Ball's "Star-land...

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