Failing at Fairness: How America's Schools Cheat Girls (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - Education - 368 pages
10 Reviews
Failing at Fairness, the result of two decades of research, shows how gender bias makes it impossible for girls to receive an education equal to that given to boys.


  • Girls' learning problems are not identified as often as boys' are

  • Boys receive more of their teachers' attention

  • Girls start school testing higher in every academic subject, yet graduate from high school scoring 50 points lower than boys on the SAT


Hard-hitting and eye-opening, Failing at Fairness should be read by every parent, especially those with daughters.
  

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Review: Failing at Fairness: How America's Schools Cheat Girls

User Review  - Margaret - Goodreads

When I read this book in middle school, it changed my life. I just found out there's an updated edition, and I'm so excited to read it!! Read full review

Review: Failing at Fairness: How America's Schools Cheat Girls

User Review  - Kim - Goodreads

It is an interesting book, but it's about 20 years old and I kept wanting updated information, particularly since I did my secondary and university schooling after the book was written and it doesn't ... Read full review

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Contents

Hidden Lessons
1
The History of Womens Education
17
Missing in Interaction
42
The SelfEsteem Slide
77
In Search of Herself
99
Test Dive
136
Colder by Degrees
161
The Miseducation of Boys
201
Different Voices Different Schools
226
The Edge of Change
251
Notes
281
Recommended Reading
327
Index
337
136
345
Copyright

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Page xvi - Sitting in the same classroom, reading the same textbook, listening to the same teacher, boys and girls receive very different educations. From grade school through graduate school female students are more likely to be invisible members of classrooms. Teachers interact with males more frequently, ask them better questions, and give them more precise and helpful feedback. Over the course of years the uneven distribution of teacher time, energy, attention, and talent, with boys getting the lion's share,...
Page 4 - Zajac asked you for your penmanship, which, by the way, looks like who did it and ran. Felipe, the reason you have hiccups is, your mouth is always open and the wind rushes in. You're in fifth grade now. So, Felipe, put a lock on it. Zip it up. Then go get a drink of water. Mrs. Zajac means business, Robert. The sooner you realize she never said everybody in the room has to do the work except for Robert, the sooner you'll get along with her. And . . . Clarence. Mrs. Zajac knows you didn't try. You...

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About the author (2010)

Dr. Myra Sadker and Dr. David Sadker, professors at The American University (Washington, D.C.), have been involved in training programs to combat sexism and sexual harassment in over forty states and overseas. Their ground-breaking research has sparked a national response to sexism in schools, including the recent report from the American Association of University Women, "How Schools Shortchange Girls."

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