Robert Fulton: his life and its results (Google eBook)

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Dodd, Mead and company, 1891 - Biography & Autobiography - 194 pages
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Page 27 - ENLARGED THE RESOURCES OF HIS COUNTRY, INCREASED THE POWER OF MAN, AND ROSE TO AN EMINENT PLACE AMONG THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS FOLLOWERS OF SCIENCE AND THE REAL BENEFACTORS OF THE WORLD.
Page 128 - My steamboat voyage to Albany and back, has turned out rather more favorable than I had calculated. The distance from New York to Albany is one hundred and fifty miles ; I ran it up in thirty-two hours, and down in thirty. I had a light breeze against me the whole way, both going and coming, and the voyage has been performed wholly by, the power of the steam engine.
Page 23 - I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the same manner as the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire engines. In cases where cold water cannot be had in plenty, the engines may be wrought by this force of steam only, by discharging the steam into the open air, after it has done its office.
Page 22 - In engines that are to be worked wholly or partially by condensation of steam, the steam is to be condensed in vessels distinct from the...
Page 22 - Thirdly, Whatever air or other elastic vapour is not condensed by the cold of the condenser, and may impede the working of the engine, is to be drawn out of the steam-vessels or condensers by means of pumps, wrought by the engines themselves, or otherwise.
Page 28 - Instruments may be made by which the largest ships, with only one man guiding them, will be carried with greater velocity than if they were full of sailors.
Page 73 - He has contrived a reservoir of air, which will enable eight men to remain under water eight hours. When the boat is above water, it has two sails, and looks just like a common boat; when she is to dive, the mast and sails are struck.
Page 35 - I have seen the model of Mr. Rumsey's Boats, constructed to work against streams : examined the powers upon which it acts, been eye witness to an actual experiment, in running water of some rapidity ; and give it as my opinion (although I had little faith before) that he has discovered the art of working boats by mechanism and small manual assistance against rapid currents...
Page 132 - ... in some instances shrunk beneath their decks from the terrific sight, and left their vessels to go on shore, while others prostrated themselves, and besought Providence to protect them from the approaches of the horrible monster, which was marching on the tides and lighting its path by the fires which it vomited.
Page 22 - ... by enclosing it in a case of wood, or any other materials that transmit heat slowly ; secondly, by surrounding it with steam or other heated bodies...

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