Security Analysis: The Classic 1940 Edition

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McGraw Hill Professional, Oct 10, 2002 - Business & Economics - 752 pages
27 Reviews

"Graham's ideas inspired the investment community for nearly a century."--Smart Money

"Graham's method of investing is as relevant today as it was when he first espoused it during the Roaring Twenties."--Investor's Business Daily

Benjamin Graham's revolutionary theories have influenced and inspired investors for nearly 70 years. First published in 1934, his Security Analysis is still considered to be the value investing bible for investors of every ilk. Yet, it is the second edition of that book, published in 1940 and long since out of print, that many experts--including Graham protégé Warren Buffet--consider to be the definitive edition. This facsimile reproduction of that seminal work makes available to investors, once again, the original thinking of "this century's (and perhaps history's) most important thinker on applied portfolio investment."

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Review: Security Analysis: Principles and Technique

User Review  - Tyson Strauser - Goodreads

While this may the most commonly cited first book on most value investors shelves I will say that after getting about half way through you'll get the gist. Margin of safety through a disciplined valuation framework is necessary to sustainable returns Read full review

Review: Security Analysis: Principles and Technique

User Review  - Justin - Goodreads

Figure out what a business is really worth. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
PART I
17
FUNDAMENTAL ELEMENTS IN THE PROBLEM OF ANALYSIS
31
Copyright

34 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Benjamin Graham was a seminal figure on Wall Street and is widely acknowledged to be the father of modern security analysis. The founder of the value school of investing and founder and former president of the Graham-Newman corporation investment fund, Graham taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business from 1928 through 1957. He popularized the examination of price-to-earnings (P/E) ratios, debt-to-equity ratios, dividend records, book values, and earnings growth, and also wrote the popular investors' guide The Intelligent Investor.

David Dodd was a colleague of Benjamin Graham's at Columbia University, where he was an assistant professor of finance.

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