Essays in astronomy (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton & company, 1900 - Astronomy - 536 pages
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Page 89 - Thou makest thine appeal to me: I bring to life, I bring to death: The spirit does but mean the breath: I know no more.
Page 89 - Are God and Nature then at strife, That Nature lends such evil dreams? So careful of the type she seems, So careless of the single life...
Page 80 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 459 - And, lo, thou art unto them as a very lovely song of one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well on an instrument: for they hear thy words, but they do them not.
Page 92 - They say, The solid earth whereon we tread In tracts of fluent heat began, And grew to seeming-random forms, The seeming prey of cyclic storms, Till at the last arose the man...
Page 418 - Thou hadst, and more, Miranda. But how is it, That this lives in thy mind ? What seest thou else In the dark backward and abysm of time ? If thou remember'st aught, ere thou cam'st here, How thou cam'st here, thou may'st.
Page 442 - First the flaming Red Sprung vivid forth ; the tawny Orange next ; And next delicious Yellow ; by whose side Fell the kind beams of all-refreshing Green : Then the pure Blue, that swells autumnal skies, Ethereal...
Page 82 - On the other hand, in the regions beneath the dark side, a solar eclipse of fifteen years in duration, under their shadow, must afford (to our ideas) an inhospitable asylum to animated beings, ill compensated by the faint light of the satellites. But we shall do wrong to judge of the fitness or unfitness of their condition from what we see around us, when, perhaps, the very combinations which convey to our minds only images of horror, may be in reality theatres of the most striking and glorious displays...
Page 92 - CONTEMPLATE all this work of Time, The giant labouring in his youth; Nor dream of human love and truth, As dying Nature's earth and lime; But trust that those we call the dead Are breathers of an ampler day For ever nobler ends.
Page 313 - Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close. The millions that around us are rushing into life cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests.

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