Pantheons: Transformations of a Monumental Idea

Front Cover
Richard Wrigley, Matthew Craske
Ashgate, 2004 - Art - 251 pages
0 Reviews
The institution of the pantheon has come a long way from its classical origins. Invented to describe a temple dedicated to many deities, the term later became so far removed from its original meaning, that by the twentieth century, it has been able to exist independently of any architectural and sculptural monument.This collection of essays is the first to trace the transformation of the monumental idea of the pantheon from its origins in Greek and Roman antiquity to its later appearance as a means of commemorating and enshrining the ideals of national identity and statehood. Illuminating the emergence of the pantheon in a range of different cultures and periods by exploring its different manifestations and implementations, the essays open new historical perspectives on the formation of national and civic identities.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

References to this book

About the author (2004)

Richard Wrigley is Professor of Art History at the University of Nottingham.

Bibliographic information