Hypertext in Context

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 31, 1991 - Computers - 166 pages
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Hypertext is the term coined for the storage of electronic data, whether it be textual or graphic, in such a way that the whole file, in addition to, say, a word processor, becomes an electronic "concordance." This book positions hypertext in an interdisciplinary area created by the overlap of psychology, computer science and information science, in addition to assessing its importance in the field of electronic publishing. Rather than simply summarize everything that has gone before, it aims to provide a position statement from which further work can be suggested. This book will be of interest to researchers, software authors, publishers and anyone concerned with distributing information.
  

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Contents

How Did We Get Here?
1
What is hypertext?
2
Why is hypertext important?
5
Hypertext historical highlights
6
Overview of the book
12
Linearity and Hypertext
15
Linearity
16
Orality and literacy the medium shapes the message
18
Conclusion
86
Creating Hypertext
87
The conversion of text into hypertext
88
Text access frequencies
89
The nature of the transformation
90
The creation of original hypertexts
92
The characteristics of extended prose arguments
93
The hypertext network or web of facts
94

The character of writing
21
Contemporary perspectives on literacy
22
The evolution of writing from record to resource
25
The printed book
32
The implications for hypertext
38
Users Tasks and Information
43
The user as reader
45
Reading from screens
48
Conclusion
50
Conclusion
54
The diversity of reading tasks
55
Observing task performance
56
Evidence for task effects
57
Conclusion
58
Hypertext versus paper
59
Hypertext versus linear electronic text
61
Hypertext versus hypertext
62
Conclusions
63
Navigation Through Complex Information Spaces
65
The psychology of navigation
67
The acquisition of cognitive maps
68
Conclusions
70
Acquiring a cognitive map of the text
72
Navigation applied to electronic documents
75
Acquiring a cognitive map of the electronic space
77
Acquiring a cognitive map of a hypertext document
78
browsers maps and structural cues
79
The provision of metaphors
81
Navigating the semantic space
85
The fallacy of simple networks as ideal representations of knowledge
98
From chaos to order from order to understanding?
100
Exploration
101
Writing
102
Conclusion
103
Hypertext Learning and Education
105
Evaluating learning in hypertext
112
Learning support environments
113
Semantic nets and web learning
115
Learner individuality
118
Incidental learning
119
Does hypertext have a role to play in learning and education?
120
The Hypertext Database A Case Study
123
understanding the users tasks and information space
124
The information space
125
The structure of the database
126
The database frontend
127
The structure of the articles
129
Testing the design
132
Conclusion
133
Where Do We Go From Here?
135
Intelligent hypertext
137
Software tools
138
what have we learned?
139
Glossary
141
References
149
Author Index
159
Subject Index
163
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

J. Richardson is at J. Richardson Consulting, Canada.

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