The Fourteenth Century, 1307-1399

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Clarendon Press, 1959 - History - 598 pages
2 Reviews
The fourteenth century in England was a turbulent, complex age: two of the century's monarchs were murdered by rivals, nearly half the population of England was wiped out by the Black Death and the Great Famine, and many more died in conflict with Scotland and in The Hundred Years War against France. During this time, the Great Schism divided the church which led to the establishment of the papacy in Avignon and an unpopular poll-tax provided the spark which ignited the Peasants' Revolt. Yet it was also a period of developments in parliamentary, administrative, and legal system, and one which witnessed the development of English literature, including Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

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Review: The Fourteenth Century, 13071399 (Oxford History of England #5)

User Review  - Zachary Moore - Goodreads

The book jumps right into its subject matter, which can be disorienting for the non-specialist. I gather it was written to be read as part of a longer series, but I have only this volume and without ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - baswood - LibraryThing

A very readable textbook packed with information. perhaps a bit dated now, but as a starting point for this period of History it is excellent. Read full review

Contents

FROM BANNOCKBURN TO BOROUGHBRIDGE
32
REACTION AND REVOLUTION 132230
71
THE ORIGINS OF THE HUNDRED YEARS
105
Copyright

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About the author (1959)

May McKisack is at Somerville College, Oxford.

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