Thoughts on the Abolition of the Slave Trade: And Civilization of Africa, with Remarks on the African Institution, and an Examination of the Report of Their Committee Recommending a General Registry of Slaves in the British West India Islands (Google eBook)

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J.M. Richardson and J. Ridgway, 1816 - Slave trade - 235 pages
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Page 199 - Where this is the case in any part of the world, those who are free are by far the most proud and jealous of their freedom. Freedom is to them not only an enjoyment, but a kind of rank and privilege. Not seeing there that freedom, as in countries where it is a common blessing, and as broad and general as the air, may be united with much abject toil, with great misery, with all the exterior of servitude, liberty looks, among them, like something that is more noble and liberal.
Page 194 - That the Colonies and Plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate Governments, and containing two millions and upwards of free inhabitants, have not had the liberty and privilege of electing and sending any Knights and Burgesses, or others, to represent them in the High Court of Parliament.
Page 184 - Representatives of the people so to be summoned as aforesaid, to make, constitute, 'and ordain laws, statutes, and ordinances for the public peace, welfare, and good government of our said colonies, and of the people and inhabitants thereof, as near as may be agreeable to the laws of England, and under such regulations and restrictions as are used in other colonies...
Page 186 - America, or relating thereto," it was declared, that " the King and Parliament of Great Britain would not impose any duty, tax, or assessment whatever, payable in any of His Majesty's Colonies, Provinces, and Plantations in North America or the West Indies, except only such duties...
Page 88 - A Bill for more effectually preventing the unlawful Importation of Slaves, and the holding free persons in slavery in the British colonies.
Page 93 - ... be accomplished by the same happy means which formerly put an end to it in England; namely, by a benign, though" insensible revolution in opinions and manners, by the encouragement of particular manumissions, and the progressive melioration of the condition of the, slaves, till it should slide insensibly into general freedom. They looked, in short, to an emancipation, of which not the slaves, but the masters, should be the willing instruments or authors."* Nothing in the letter of which Mr.
Page 223 - The rights of men are in a sort of middle, incapable of definition, but not impossible to be discerned. The rights of men in governments are their advantages ; and these are often in balances between differences of good; in compromises sometimes between good and evil, and sometimes between evil and evil.
Page 93 - But it was denied only in the insidious meaning of the imputation itself. They did not aim at an emancipation to be effected by insurrection in the West Indies, or to be ordained precipitately by positive law: but they never denied, and scrupled not to avow, that they did lo.ok forward to a future extinction of slavery in the colonies, to 7 be accomplished by the same happy means which formerly put an end to it in England; namely, by a benign, though...
Page 222 - The pretended rights of these theorists are all extremes; and in proportion as they are metaphysically true, they are morally and politically false. The rights of men are in a sort of middle, incapable of definition, but not impossible to be discerned.
Page 161 - Whereas it is not only highly incumbent upon, but the first and most serious duty of all magistrates and bodies politic, to uphold and encourage the due, proper, and solemn exercise of religion and worshipping of God...

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