The Dramatic Works in the Beaumont and Fletcher Canon: Volume 10, The Honest Man's Fortune, Rollo, Duke of Normandy, The Spanish Curate, The Lover's Progress, The Fair Maid of the Inn, The Laws of Candy

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 15, 1996 - Drama - 758 pages
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This is the tenth and final volume in the definitive series of critical, old-spelling texts of the plays in the Beaumont and Fletcher canon, in which the texts are established on modern bibliographical principles. This volume contains the texts of six plays written by Fletcher and his collaborators, Nathan Field, Philip Massinger, Ben Jonson, George Chapman, John Ford and John Webster. The plays are The Honest Man's Fortune, Rollo, Duke of Normandy, The Spanish Curate, The Lovers' Progress, The Fair Maid of the Inn, and The Laws of Candy.
  

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Contents

Foreword page vi
17
Edited by CYRUS H O Y John B Trevor Professor
119
Editedby GEORGE WALTON WILLIAMS Professor
154
THE SPANISH CURATE
368
Editedby ROBERT KEAN TURNER Professor
404
THE LOVERS PROGRESS
430
THE LAWS OF CANDY
664
Editedby CYRUS
739
Titles of the Dramatic Works in the Beaumont and
749
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About the author (1996)

Francis Beaumont (1584-1616) and his collaborator John Fletcher (1579-1625) wrote some of the most popular dramas of Elizabethan England. Beaumont and Fletcher began to work together in about 1606 and continued their partnership until Beaumont's retirement in 1613. Beaumont apparently was the primary plotter of their plays, while Fletcher had a strong flair for language. Their comedies and tragedies include The Woman Hater, The Coxcomb, A Maid's Tragedy, The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Wit Without Money, and Philaster, Or Love Lies A Bleeding. Fletcher authored several other plays alone, such as the comedy The Wild Goose Chase (1621) and the tragedy Bonduca (1614). Cardenio, or the Second Maiden's Tragedy, and Two Noble Kinsmen are attributed to Fletcher, although there has been some speculation that he collaborated with Shakespeare on the plays. Beaumont and Fletcher's work is energetic, rich in stage thrills, declamatory speeches and bizarre plots. Although their work is not as unified as that of some of their contemporaries including Shakespeare and Webster, it influenced the development of Restoration comedy and tragedy, and thus played an important role in the history of drama.

The team of Francis Beaumont (1584-1616) and John Fletcher (1579-1625) wrote some of the most popular dramas of Elizabethan England. Beaumont and Fletcher began to work together in about 1606 and continued their partnership until Beaumont's retirement in 1613. Beaumont apparently was the primary plotter of their plays, while Fletcher had a strong flair for language. Their comedies and tragedies include The Woman Hater, The Coxcomb, A Maid's Tragedy, The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Wit Without Money, and Philaster, Or Love Lies A Bleeding. Fletcher wrote several plays alone as well, such as the comedy The Wild Goose Chase (1621) and the tragedy Bonduca (1614). Cardenio, or the Second Maiden's Tragedy, and Two Noble Kinsmen are attributed to Fletcher, although there has been some speculation he collaborated on these with Shakespeare. Beaumont and Fletcher's work is energetic, full of stage thrills, declamatory speeches and bizarre plots. Though it is not as rich and unified as that of some of their contemporaries including Shakespeare and Webster, it influenced the development of Restoration comedy and tragedy, and thus played an important role in the history of drama.

Fredson Bowers is Linden Kent Professor of English, Emeritus, at the University of Virginia.

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