Graphic Classics: Bram Stoker

Front Cover
Bram Stoker
Eureka Productions, 2003 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 144 pages
4 Reviews
Graphic Classics: Bram Stoker is the seventh in a series of books which present great literature in comics and heavily illustrated format by some of the best artists working today in the fields of comics, book illustration, and fine arts. The book includes comics adaptations of "The Lair of the White Worm", an excerpt from Dracula, plus six other great stories by the great writer, Bram Stoker.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ElizaJane - LibraryThing

Reason for Reading: I'm working on reading the complete series. I had to ILL this volume and was a little disappointed to see I received the 1st edition (now out of print) as a more recent 2nd edition ... Read full review

Review: Graphic Classics 7: Bram Stoker (Graphic Classics #7)

User Review  - Jeremy Stephens - Goodreads

Some of the stories such as Lair of the White Worm were too abridged for my liking. I did like some of the tongue-in-cheek silliness of some of the segments such as Van Helsings guide to vampires. Read full review

Contents

Introduction by Mort Castle
5
Torture Tower adapted 6 illustrated by Onsmith Jererni 40
76
The Vampire Hunters Guide illustrated by hunt Cmerson
89
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, the son of a civil servant. Although a semi-invalid as a child, he went on the gain a reputation as a fine athlete at Trinity College, where he also excelled in mathematics and philosophy. Stoker worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He also wrote 15 works of fiction, only one of which is very memorable - Dracula (1897). This work, involving hypnotism, magic, the supernatural, and other elements of gothic fiction, went on to sell over one million copies and is still selling strongly today. So well known has his fictional character become that today it is possible to visit the castle of Count Dracula in the Transylvanian region of Romania, a country that Stoker never visited. Several film versions of the story, both serious and comic, have made Stoker's work a part of modern mythology. His novel The Lair of the White Worm (1911) has also been made into film. It and the novel The Lady of the Shroud are, like Dracula, fantastic tales of horror.

Bibliographic information