A History of the Indians of the United States (Google eBook)

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University of Oklahoma Press, Apr 17, 2013 - Social Science - 464 pages
2 Reviews

In 1906 when the Creek Indian Chitto Harjo was protesting the United States government's liquidation of his tribe's lands, he began his argument with an account of Indian history from the time of Columbus, "for, of course, a thing has to have a root before it can grow." Yet even today most intelligent non-Indian Americans have little knowledge of Indian history and affairs those lessons have not taken root.

This book is an in-depth historical survey of the Indians of the United States, including the Eskimos and Aleuts of Alaska, which isolates and analyzes the problems which have beset these people since their first contacts with Europeans. Only in the light of this knowledge, the author points out, can an intelligent Indian policy be formulated.

In the book are described the first meetings of Indians with explorers, the dispossession of the Indians by colonial expansion, their involvement in imperial rivalries, their beginning relations with the new American republic, and the ensuing century of war and encroachment.

The most recent aspects of government Indian policy are also detailed the good and bad administrative practices and measures to which the Indians have been subjected and their present situation.

Miss Debo's style is objective, and throughout the book the distinct social environment of the Indians is emphasized—an environment that is foreign to the experience of most white men. Through ignorance of that culture and life style the results of non-Indian policy toward Indians have been centuries of blundering and tragedy.

In response to Indian history, an enlightened policy must be formulated: protection of Indian land, vocational and educational training, voluntary relocation, encouragement of tribal organization, recognition of Indians' social groupings, and reliance on Indians' abilities to direct their own lives.

The result of this new policy would be a chance for Indians to live now, whether on their own land or as adjusted members of white society. Indian history is usually highly specialized and is never recorded in books of general history. This book unifies the many specialized volumes which have been written about their history and culture. It has been written not only for persons who work with Indians or for students of Indian culture, but for all Americans of good will.

  

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Review: A History of the Indians of the United States

User Review  - Yasmin - Goodreads

It was a very well written and certainly opened up a integral part of history of the US that is often over looked in schools, high schools, etc. However, at times I was baffled to say the least when ... Read full review

Review: A History of the Indians of the United States

User Review  - Richard Etzel - Goodreads

Written by a Native American giving a different perspective to "the Indian Wars", the "trail of tears" and the displacing of thousands of people from there native lands to "reservations". I think it a ... Read full review

Contents

The Indians in Their Homeland
3
The White Man Comes
19
The White Man Stays
36
Caught in the Power Struggle
69
A New Power Rises
84
The New Power Advances
107
An Indian Territory Is Established
117
History Repeats Itself
150
The Apaches Make Their Last Stand
267
Now the Reservations
284
Breaking Up the Reservations
299
What Happened to the Indians?
316
The White Man Repents
332
Back to the Old Bad Days
349
Modern Florida Seminoles
355
Regents of Navajo Community College 36869
370

The Indian Territory Joins the White Mans War
168
1o The White Mans War Affects the Frontiers
184
Reconstruction in the Indian Territory
201
Hunters of the Plains Settle in the Indian Territory
215
North Plains and Northwest Tribes Fight for Their Homelands
233
George Bent and his wife Pgtf
243
Pleasant Porter
256
2o The White Man Gets a New Chance
383
MAPS
384
The Indians Find New Hope
405
Selected Readings
423
Index
429
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Angie Debo was reared in a pioneer community, at Marshall, Oklahoma, where it has been her privilege to know from childhood the folkways of the Indians and the traditions of the western settlers. A member of her community high school's first graduating class, she later attended the University of Oklahoma, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa, and took her B.A. and later her Ph.D. degree; she received her master's degree from the University of Chicago. Her education was combined with intervals of teaching in country schools, starting at the age of sixteen.

Miss Debo's distinguished reputation as a regional scholar has been enhanced by her book, The Rise and. Fall of the Choctaw Republic, which won the John H. Dunning prize of the American Historical Society for the best book submitted in the field of United States history in 1934, and for her later, book, And Still the Waters Run. She has been a teacher in schools and colleges both in Oklahoma and Texas and was curator of the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas. More recently she has been state director of the Federal Writers' Project in Oklahoma, in which capacity she edited Oklahoma: A Guide to the Sooner State for the American Guide Series.

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