Early Cold War Spies: The Espionage Trials that Shaped American Politics (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 28, 2006 - History
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Communism was never a popular ideology in America, but the vehemence of American anticommunism varied from passive disdain in the 1920s to fervent hostility in the early years of the Cold War. Nothing so stimulated the white hot anticommunism of the late 1940s and 1950s more than a series of spy trials that revealed that American Communists had co-operated with Soviet espionage against the United States and had assisted in stealing the technical secrets of the atomic bomb as well as penetrating the US State Department, the Treasury Department, and the White House itself. This book, first published in 2006, reviews the major spy cases of the early Cold War (Hiss-Chambers, Rosenberg, Bentley, Gouzenko, Coplon, Amerasia and others) and the often-frustrating clashes between the exacting rules of the American criminal justice system and the requirements of effective counter-espionage.
  

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Early Cold War spies: the espionage trials that shaped American politics

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The past decade has witnessed a plethora of books about Cold War spying, with no break in sight. The writing team of Haynes (manuscript division, Library of Congress) and Klehr (politics & history ... Read full review

Contents

1
1
to espionage The cases dealt with in the book focus
6
Politics of the Early Cold War
8
Based on hitherto secret documents provided by the Russian Foreign
19
2
23
Lattimore faded rapidly After the reversal at the appeals court
48
3
60
espionage networks the Silvermaster group and the Perlo group each
66
5
138
The Background
139
Los Alamos assured the Soviets that the material they were
146
Benjamin Smilg working as a research aeronautical engineer at a
157
Ted Hall never faced trial for his atomic espionage His
187
6
192
The New York Trial
204
firm who took over her defense in her second trial
207

representative in China Coe Adler and White performed a signal
67
identified as spies went in various directions after they were
82
dichotomy in being a fulltime member of the Rooseveltian progressive
91
4
92
Whittaker Chambers
93
of information were sufficient to convince Secretary of State Byrnes
107
Hiss after the Trial
132
7
208
unquestioned leader of the USSR Trotskyism a political crime and
209
Mark Zborowski
212
Double Agent
220
8
230
and were neutralized as security threats The KGB understood that
234

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Page 13 - ... no person not being authorized by the sender shall intercept any communication and divulge or publish the existence, contents, substance, purport, effect, or meaning of such intercepted communication to any person...

About the author (2006)

John Earl Haynes is a 20th Century Political Historian in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He is the author or editor of four books: Calvin Coolidge and the Coolidge Era: Essays on the History of the 1920s (editor, 1998); Red Scare or Red Menace? American Communism and Anticommunism in the Cold War Era (1996); Communism and Anti-Communism in the United States: An Annotated Guide to Historical Writings (1987); and Dubious Alliance: The Making of Minnesota's DFL Party (1984).

Harvey Klehr is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Politics and History at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is the author of five books, Communist Cadre: The Social Background of the American Communist Party Elite (1978); The Heyday of American Communism: The Depression Decade (1984); Biographical Dictionary of the American Left (1986); Far Left of Center: The American Radical Left Today (1988); The Amerasia Spy Case: Prelude to McCarthyism (1996). He was honored with the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award for Emory College in 1983.

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