The Lesson Of The Master

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 68 pages
18 Reviews
. Paul Overt was a faithless smoker; he would puff a cigarette for reasons with which tobacco had nothing to do. This was particularly the case on the occasion of which I speak; his motive was the vision of a little direct talk with Henry St. George.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
6
3 stars
6
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: The Lesson of the Master (Borges "Biblioteca Personal")

User Review  - Alysia - Goodreads

While initially interesting this story dragged towards the end. The 'strong' Paul Ortel is really just a whimpering weak willed lackey who follows St. George's advice. And what great advice it is ... Read full review

Review: The Lesson of the Master (Borges "Biblioteca Personal")

User Review  - Kahuna1234567890 - Goodreads

The leading lady of this book is not perfect in every way so naturally this attracts accusations of 'misogyny'. Nonsense, of course, but it does annoy me. This is a fine novella that explores an ... Read full review

References to this book

About the author (2004)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

Bibliographic information