Real-Time Systems: Scheduling, Analysis, and Verification (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 27, 2003 - Computers - 552 pages
3 Reviews
The first book to provide a comprehensive overview of the subject rather than a collection of papers.
  • The author is a recognized authority in the field as well as an outstanding teacher lauded for his ability to convey these concepts clearly to many different audiences.
  • A handy reference for practitioners in the field.
  

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This was for a real time systems graduate class Read full review

Contents

1 INTRODUCTION
1
2 ANALYSIS AND VERIFICATION OF NONREALTIME SYSTEMS
10
3 REALTIME SCHEDULING AND SCHEDULABILITY ANALYSIS
41
4 MODEL CHECKING OF FINITESTATE SYSTEMS
86
5 VISUAL FORMALISM STATECHARTS AND STATEMATE
134
6 REALTIME LOGIC GRAPHTHEORETIC ANALYSIS AND MODECHART
148
7 VERIFICATION USING TIMED AUTOMATA
187
8 TIMED PETRI NETS
212
9 PROCESS ALGEBRA
237
10 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF PROPOSITIONALLOGIC RULEBASED SYSTEMS
259
11 TIMING ANALYSIS OF PREDICATELOGIC RULEBASED SYSTEMS
367
12 OPTIMIZATION OF RULEBASED SYSTEMS
436
BIBLIOGRAPHY
467
INDEX
505
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 11 - A literal is an atomic formula or the negation of an atomic formula, and we refer to these as being positive or negative, respectively.
Page 472 - The Infeasibility of Quantifying the Reliability of Life-Critical Real-Time Software," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Vol.
Page 501 - W. Zhao, K. Ramamritham, and J. Stankovic, "Scheduling Tasks with Resource Requirements in Hard Real-Time Systems," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, May 1987.
Page 493 - CY Park and AC Shaw, Experiments with a Program Timing Tool Based on Source-Level Timing Schema, IEEE Computer, May 1991, 48-56.
Page 19 - ML are defined recursively as follows: 1. An atom is a formula. 2. If G is a formula, then so are ~G and G*.

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About the author (2003)

ALBERT M. K. CHENG, PhD, received his doctorate in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin, where he held a GTE Foundation Doctoral Fellowship. He is currently an associate professor in the department of computer science at the University of Houston, where he is the founding director of the Real-Time Systems Laboratory. He is the author and coauthor of over sixty refereed publications, and has received numerous awards, including the NSF Career award. He has served as a technical consultant for several organizations, including IBM, and has served on the program committees of many conferences.

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