The Pilgrim's Regress: An Allegorical Apology for Christianity, Reason, and Romanticism

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Michael Hague Publishers, Jan 1, 1992 - Fiction - 219 pages
39 Reviews
The first book written by C. S. Lewis after his conversion, The Pilgrim's Regress is, in a sense, the record of Lewis's own search for meaning and spiritual satisfaction -- a search that eventually led him to Christianity.

Here is the story of the pilgrim John and his odyssey to an enchanting island which has created in him an intense longing 7mdash; a mysterious, sweet desire. John's pursuit of this desire takes him through adventures with such people as Mr. Enlightenment, Media Halfways, Mr. Mammon, Mother Kirk, Mr. Sensible, and Mr. Humanist and through such cities as Thrill and Eschropolis as well as the Valley of Humiliation.

Though the dragons and giants here are different from those in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Lewis's allegory performs the same function of enabling the author to say simply and through fantasy what would otherwise have demanded a full-length philosophy of religion.

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Review: The Pilgrim's Regress

User Review  - Tommy Grooms - Goodreads

I didn't really know what to expect going in with this book. The idea of an allegorical story to me always seemed lazy and annoying (due no doubt in part to my Tolkienien resistance to dominant ... Read full review

Review: The Pilgrim's Regress

User Review  - MJ - Goodreads

It is always disappointing to read a book by a favorite author that disappoints. In this case, there are clear reasons why it does so, some of them outlined in the Afterword to this, the 1943 edition ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis, "Jack" to his intimates, was born on November 29, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland. His mother died when he was 10 years old and his lawyer father allowed Lewis and his brother Warren extensive freedom. The pair were extremely close and they took full advantage of this freedom, learning on their own and frequently enjoying games of make-believe. These early activities led to Lewis's lifelong attraction to fantasy and mythology, often reflected in his writing. He enjoyed writing about, and reading, literature of the past, publishing such works as the award-winning The Allegory of Love (1936), about the period of history known as the Middle Ages. Although at one time Lewis considered himself an atheist, he soon became fascinated with religion. He is probably best known for his books for young adults, such as his Chronicles of Narnia series. This fantasy series, as well as such works as The Screwtape Letters (a collection of letters written by the devil), is typical of the author's interest in mixing religion and mythology, evident in both his fictional works and nonfiction articles. Lewis served with the Somerset Light Infantry in World War I; for nearly 30 years he served as Fellow and tutor of Magdalen College at Oxford University. Later, he became Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University. C.S. Lewis married late in life, in 1957, and his wife, writer Joy Davidman, died of cancer in 1960. He remained at Cambridge until his death on November 22, 1963.

Growing up in California in the 1950s, Michael was greatly influenced by the Prince Valiant comics and the Walt Disney Studio. His mother, who attended art school in London before immigrating to the US, nurtured his artistic talents and love for books. Her own childhood picture books impressed her young son so much that from an early age he knew exactly what he wanted to be ? a baseball player. Fortunately, his inability to hit a curve ball determined that he rediscover his true vocation, that of a book illustrator. Michael attended Art Center College of Design where he met his wife of over forty years, Kathleen Hague. After the two graduated with honors, they moved to Kansas City where Michael worked for Hallmark Cards designing greeting cards and calendars. Hallmark published his first book in 1975, a pop-up version of Gulliver's Travels. They then relocated to Colorado Springs to work at Current, again creating art for paper products. Several years later Michael opened his own studio and began work as a freelance illustrator. The Hagues stayed on in Colorado Springs where he and Kathleen raised three children and where the couple still live and work. Michael Hague has been inspired by a wide variety of artistic styles, ranging from the work of the Disney Studios to the oriental printmakers Hiroshige and Hokusai and the drawings of Michelangelo. He is a fan of contemporary comic and book illustrators as well as turn-of-the-century illustrators such Arthur Rackham, W. Heath Robinson, Howard Pyle and Herman Vogel. He is an avid collector of their books. About his life and work, Michael Hague says, ?I count myself as one of the most fortunate of beings. For as an artist I have not only the pleasure, but the duty to daydream. It is part of my work. I have been a contented daydreamer all my life, often to the exasperation of those around me. I have lived what seems to be a charmed life. I?ve raised three wonderful children, live with my wife in a pink house with our two large dogs, and my work enables me to remain young at heart, forever like Peter Pan. ? The Michael Hague Signature Series is a wonderful tribute to a brilliant career and to the finest literature published for children and adults of all ages.

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