Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology, Volume 1

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1978 - Business & Economics - 1470 pages
8 Reviews
Max Weber's Economy and Society is the greatest sociological treatise written in this century. Published posthumously in Germany in the early 1920's, it has become a constitutive part of the modern sociological imagination. Economy and Society was the first strictly empirical comparison of social structures and normative orders in world-historical depth, containing the famous chapters on social action, religion, law, bureaucracy, charisma, the city, and the political community with its dimensions of class, status and power.

Economy and Status is Weber's only major treatise for an educated general public. It was meant to be a broad introduction, but in its own way it is the most demanding textbook yet written by a sociologist. The precision of its definitions, the complexity of its typologies and the wealth of its historical content make the work a continuos challenge at several levels of comprehension: for the advanced undergraduate who gropes for his sense of society, for the graduate student who must develop his own analytical skills, and for the scholar who must match wits with Weber.

When the long-awaited first complete English edition of Economy and Society was published in 1968, Arthur Stinchcombe wrote in the American Journal of Sociology: "My answer to the question of whether people should still start their sociological intellectual biographies with Economy and Society is yes." Reinhard Bendix noted in the American Sociological Review that the "publication of a compete English edition of Weber's most systematic work [represents] the culmination of a cultural transmission to the American setting...It will be a study-guide and compendium for years to come for all those interested in historical sociology and comparative study."

In a lengthy introduction, Guenther Roth traces the intellectual prehistory of Economy and Society, the gradual emergence of its dominant themes and the nature of its internal logic.

Mr. Roth is a Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Mr. Wittich heads an economic research group at the United Nations.
  

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Review: Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology

User Review  - Prakhar Bindal - Goodreads

Weber made permanent contributions to the understanding of society with his discussions of comparative religion, bureaucracy, charisma, and the distinctions among status, class, and party. Read full review

Review: Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology

User Review  - Sam Pearson - Goodreads

Absolutely indispensable for any serious scholar in any number of disciplines. Read full review

Contents

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
xxv
INTRODUCTION by Guenther Roth
xxxiii
The Structure of Economy and Society Ixvi
lxvi
Webers Political Writings
civ
CONCEPTUAL EXPOSITION
1
Basic Sociological Terms
3
The Definitions of Sociology and of Social Action
4
Acknowledgements
13
THE GREAT RELIGIONS AND THE WORLD 61 I
611
The ThisWorldliness of Islam and Its Economic Ethics
623
Jesus Indifference Toward the World
630
Its Impersonality and Ethic Fragment
635
VOLUME 2
640
The Role of Party Practices in the Emergence and Development
754
Development of New Law Through Imposition from Above
760
The Role of the Law Prophets and of the Folk Justice of
768

B Social Action
22
Types of Social Action
24
The Concept of Social Relationship
26
Usage Custom Selfinterest
29
Legitimate Order
31
Convention and Law
33
Tradition Faith Enactment
36
Conflict Competition Selection
38
Communal and Associative Relationships
40
Open and Closed Relationships
43
Representation and Mutual Responsibility
46
The Organization
48
Consensual and Imposed Order in Organizations
50
Administrative and Regulative Order
51
Enterprise Formal Organization Voluntary and Compulsory
52
2
53
Political and Hierocratic Organizations
54
Notes
56
Sociological Categories of Economic Action
63
The Concept of Utility
68
Modes of the Economic Orientation of Action
69
Typical Measures of Rational Economic Action
71
Types of Economic Organizations
74
Media of Exchange Means of Payment Money
75
The Primary Consequences of the Use of Money Credit
80
The Market
82
Formal and Substantive Rationality of Economic Action
85
The Rationality of Monetary Accounting Management and Budgeting
86
The Concept and Types of ProfitMaking The Role of Capital
90
Calculations in Kind
100
Substantive Conditions of Formal Rationality in a Money Economy
107
Market Economies and Planned Economies
109
Types of Economic Division of Labor
114
Types of the Technical Division of Labor
118
Types of the Technical Division of LaborContinued
120
Social Aspects of the Division of Labor
122
Social Aspects of the Division of LaborContinued
125
The Appropriation of the Material Means of Production
130
The Appropriation of Managerial Functions
136
The Expropriation of Workers from the Means of Production
137
The Expropriation of Workers from the Means of Production Continued
139
The Concept of Occupation and Types of Occupational Structure
140
The Principal Forms of Appropriation and of Market Relationship
144
Conditions Underlying the Calculability of the Productivity of Labor i 50
150
Forms of Communism i 53
153
Capital Goods and Capital Accounting i 54
154
The Concept of Trade and Its Principal Forms i 56
156
The Concept of Trade and Its Principal FormsContinued
157
The Concept of Trade and Its Principal FormsConcluded
159
The Conditions of Maximum Formal Rationality of Capital Accounting
161
The Principal Modes of Capitalistic Orientation of ProfitMaking
164
Currency Money
166
Restricted Money
174
Note Money
177
The Formal and Substantive Validity of Money
178
Methods and Aims of Monetary Policy
180
A Critical Note on the State Theory of Money
184
The NonMonetary Significance of Political Bodies for the Economic Order
193
The Financing of Political Bodies
194
Repercussions of Public Financing on Private Economic Activity
199
The Influence of Economic Factors on the Formation of Organizations
201
The Mainspring of Economic Activity
202
Notes
206
THE TYPES OF LEGITIMATE DOMINATION i THE BASIS OF LEGITIMACY
212
The Three Pure Types of Authority 21 5
215
LEGAL AUTHORITY WITH A BUREAUCRATIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
217
The Pure TypeContinued
220
Monocratic Bureaucracy
223
Charismatic Authority and Charismatic Community
241
Types of Appropriation by the Charismatic Staff
249
FEUDALISM
255
Combinations of the Different Types of Authority
262
COLLEGIALITY AND THE DIVISION OF POWERS
271
The Functionally Specific Division of Powers
282
DIRECT DEMOCRACY AND REPRESENTATIVE ADMINISTRATION
289
Representation by the Agents of Interest Groups
297
Notes
307
The Economy and Social Norms 31 i
311
The Economic Relationships of Organized Groups
339
Household Neighborhood and Kin Group
356
Household Enterprise and Oikos
370
Spirit and of the Modern Capitalist Enterprise
375
Ethnic Groups
385
Nationality and Cultural Prestige
395
Religious Groups The Sociology of Religion
399
Canonical Writings Dogmas and Scriptural Religion
457
Preaching and Pastoral Care as Results of Prophetic Religion
464
Aristocratic Irreligion versus Warring for the Faith
472
The Religious Disinclinations of Slaves Day Laborers and the Modern
484
The Differential Function of Salvation Religion for Higher and Lower
490
RELIGION
500
The Religious Impact of Proletarian PettyBourgeois and Pariah
507
Elite and Mass Intellectualism in Medieval Christianity
513
Predestination and Providence
522
Notes
529
Salvation Through Good Works
532
The Certainty of Grace and the Religious Virtuosi
538
Mysticism versus Asceticism
544
The Decisive Differences Between Oriental and Occidental Salvation
551
SOTERIOLOGY OR SALVATION FROM OUTSIDE
557
Salvation Through Faith Alone and Its AntiIntellectual Consequences
563
Salvation Through Belief in Predestination
572
Familial Piety Neighborly Help and Compensation
579
Notes
589
Natural Law and Vocational Ethics
597
The Religious Status of Marriage and of Women
604
The Role of Law Specialists
775
Law as a Craft
785
Law as a ScienceOrigins
789
FORMAL AND SUBSTANTIVE RATIONALIZATION THEOCRATIC
809
The Substantive Rationalization of Sacred Law
815
Persian Law
822
Canon Law
828
The Driving Forces Behind Codification
848
Types of Patrimonial Codification
856
VJi THE FORMAL QUALITIES OF REVOLUTIONARY
865
Class Relations in Natural Law Ideology
871
Notes
895
Political Communities
901
Notes
939
Bureaucracy
956
The Quantitative Development of Administrative Tasks
969
The Leveling of Social Differences
983
The Indeterminate Economic Consequences of Bureaucratization
989
Bureaucracy and Education
998
B Excursus on the Cultivated Man
1001
Conclusion
1002
Notes
1003
Patriarchalism and Patrimonialism
1006
Domination by Honoratiores and Pure Patriarchalism
1009
Patrimonial Domination
1010
The Patrimonial State
1013
Patrimonial and NonPatrimonial Armies
1015
Patrimonial Domination and Traditional Legitimacy
1020
Patrimonial Satisfaction of Public Wants Liturgy and Collective Responsibility Compulsory Associations
1022
Patrimonial Offices
1025
Patrimonial versus Bureaucratic Officialdom
1028
o The Maintenance of Patrimonial Officials Benefices in Kind and in Fees
1031
Decentralized and Typified Administration As a Consequence of Appropriation and Monopolization
1038
Defenses of the Patrimonial State Against Disintegration
1042
Ancient Egypt
1044
The Chinese Empire
1047
Satrapies and Divisional Principalities
1051
Patrimonial Rulers versus Local Lords
1055
The English Administration by Notables the Gentrys Justices of the Peace and the Evolution of the Gentleman
1059
Tsarist Patrimonialism
1064
Patrimonialism and Status Honor
1068
Notes
1069
Feudalism Standestaat and Patrimonialism
1070
Fiefs and Benefices
1073
The Military Origin of Feudalism
1077
Feudal Legitimation
1078
The Feudal Separation of Powers and Its Typification
1082
The Standestaat and the Transition from Feudalism to Bureaucracy
1085
Patrimonial Officialdom
1088
The Indeterminate Economic Preconditions of Patrimonialism and Feudalism
1090
The Impact of Trade on the Development of Patrimonialism
1092
The Stabilizing Influence of Patrimonialism and Feudalism Upon the Economy
1094
Monopolism and Mercantilism
1097
The Formation and Distribution of Wealth under Feudalism
1099
Patrimonial Monopoly and Capitalist Privilege
1102
Ethos and Style of Life
1104
Notes
1109
Charisma and Its Transformation
1111
Foundations and Instability of Charismatic Authority
1114
The Revolutionary Nature of Charisma
1115
Range of Effectiveness
1117
The Social Structure of Charismatic Domination
1119
U THE GENESIS AND TRANSFORMATION OF CHARISMATIC AUTHORITY I I 21
1121
The Selection of Leaders and the Designation of Successors
1123
Charismatic Acclamation
1125
The Transition to Democratic Suffrage
1127
The Meaning of Election and Representation
1128
Excursus on Party Control by Charismatic Leaders Notables and Bureaucrats
1130
Charisma and the Persistent Forms of Domination
1133
Lineage Charisma Clan State and Primogeniture
1135
Office Charisma
1139
Charismatic Kingship
1141
Charismatic Education
1143
The Plutocratic Acquisition of Charisma
1145
The Charismatic Legitimation of the Existing Order
1146
Hi DISCIPLINE AND CHARISMA
1148
The Origins of Discipline in War i i 50
1150
The Discipline of LargeScale Economic Organizations
1155
Notes
1156
Political and Hierocratic Domination
1158
Hierocracy Theocracy and Caesaropapism 11 59
1159
The Church
1163
Hierocratic Reglementation of Conduct and Opposition to Personal Charisma
1164
The Hierocratic Ambivalence Toward Asceticism and Monasticism
1166
The Impact of Hierocracy on Economic Development
1181
Hierocracy in the Age of Capitalism and of Bourgeois Democracy
1193
Hierocracy and Economic Ethos in Judaism i 200
1200
Notes
1210
The City NonLegitimate Domination mi
1212
Consequences
1248
The confraternitates in the Germanic North
1256
Notes
1262
The Monopolistically Closed Rule of the Nobili in Venice
1268
English City Oligarchies and Their Constraint by the Royal
1276
FamilyCharismatic Kingdoms in Antiquity
1282
Contrasts and Similarities
1290
The Revolutionary Character of the Popolo as a NonLegitimate
1302
Plebs and Tribune in Rome
1308
The Replacement of Notables by Democratic Functionaries
1314
ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL DEMOCRACY
1339
Excursus on Athenian versus Roman Constituencies
1348
Types of Social Action and Groups
1375
Parliament and Government in a Reconstructed Germany
1381
INDEX
i
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About the author (1978)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

Guenther Roth is professor of sociology at the University of Washington. He co-edited Weber's "Economy and Society" and co-authored "Scholarship and Partisanship" (with Reinhard Bendix) and "Max Weber's Vision of History" (with Wolfgang Schluchter).

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