The Day the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk 1980 to 1984

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Cherry Red Books, Mar 1, 2007 - Music - 375 pages
7 Reviews
If the bands in Burning Britain were loud, political, and uncompromising, those examined in Ian Glasper's new book were even more so. With Crass and Poison Girls opening the floodgates, the arrival of bands like Zoundz, Flux of Pink Indians, Conflict, Subhumans, Dirt, The Mob, Omega Tribe, and Icons of Filth heralded a new age of honesty and integrity in the 1980s underground music scene. It was a time when punk stopped being merely a radical fashion statement, and became a force for real social change. Anarchy in punk rock no longer meant "cash from chaos"—it meant "freedom, peace, and unity." Comprehensively covering all the groups and names, big and small,  The Day the Country Died also features exclusive interviews and hundreds of never-before-published photos. 

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Review: The noDay the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk 1980 to 1984

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

Exhaustive encyclopedia like book detailing the bands involved in the UK peace/anarcho punk scene. More of a research/reference tool than a nonfiction read, but well researched and informative. The ... Read full review

Review: The Day the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk 1980 to 1984

User Review  - Josh - Goodreads

This book is a great break down of the late 70s/early 80s anarcho punk scene in the UK. It starts with Crass (which has by far the most extensive biography) and then moves around London and then ... Read full review

Contents

acknowuedoieijents
7
CrIAP7IER ONIE
15
Flux Of Pink Indians
32
Copyright

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