The Island World of the Pacific Ocean (Google eBook)

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Howard & Pariser, 1885 - Oceania - 329 pages
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Page 213 - Thus then to man the voice of Nature spake : % ' Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield ; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field: Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave ; Learn of the little nautilus to sail ; Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale...
Page 256 - State, has suffered in some of its departments, through the construction of two additional transcontinental railroads the one to the north, and the other to the south, of...
Page 201 - Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, A sylvan scene; and as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woody theatre Of stateliest view.
Page 98 - As when far off at sea a fleet descried Hangs in the clouds, by equinoctial winds Close sailing from Bengala, or the isles Of Ternate and Tidore, whence merchants bring Their spicy drugs ; they on the trading flood, Through the wide Ethiopian to the Cape, Ply stemming nightly toward the pole : so seem'd Far off the flying fiend.
Page 67 - DEEP in the wave is a coral grove, Where the purple mullet and gold-fish rove ; Where the sea-flower spreads its leaves of blue, That never are wet with falling dew, But in bright and changeful beauty shine, Far down in the green and glassy brine.
Page 73 - When first seen from the deck of a vessel, only a series of dark points is descried just above the horizon. Shortly after the points enlarge into the plumed tops of cocoa-nut trees, and a line of green, interrupted at intervals, is traced along the water's surface. Approaching still nearer, the lake and its belt n of verdure are spread out before the eye, and a scene of more interest can scarcely be imagined.
Page 46 - The sea-snatched isle is the home of men, And mountains exult where the wave hath been. But why do ye plant 'neath the billows dark The wrecking reef for the gallant bark ? There are snares enough on the tented field, 'Mid the...
Page 56 - There are in consequence but few places where boats can land, and only one harbor for ships, that of Mataatua ; even this is unsafe from November to February, when the northwesterly gales prevail. The soil is fertile, and was composed in every part of the island that was visited, of decomposed volcanic rock and vegetable mold.
Page 247 - Sang'ir appeared like a body of liquid fire, extending itself in every direction. The fire and columns of flame continued to rage with unabated fury, until the darkness, caused by the quantity of falling matter, obscured it at about 8 PM Stones at this time fell very thick at Sang'ir, some of them as large as two fists, but generally not larger than walnuts.
Page 334 - Mollusks of all kinds, is crowded into the warm and crystal waters of the tropical ocean, rests in the white sands, clothes the rough cliffs, clings where the room is already occupied, like a parasite, upon the first comers, or swims through the shallows and depths of the elements while the mass of the vegetation is of a far inferior magnitude.

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