The Crisis of the Naval War (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cassell, Limited, 1920 - World War, 1914-1918 - 331 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Director of Director of Director of Operations Division. Intelligence Division. Mobilization Division. In addition to other duties, the Mobilization Division was charged with the responsibility for the supply of fuel to the Fleet, from the Staff point of view. In the organization introduced in 1911 the duties of the Chief of the Staff were defined as being of an advisory nature. He possessed no executive powers. Consequently all orders affecting the movements of ships required the approval of the...
Page 180 - January 23 and 24, 1917, and another was held during the visit of Admiral Mayo and at the instigation of the Government of the United States on September 4 and 5, 1917. On this latter occasion important discussions had taken place, principally on the subject of submarine warfare, the methods of dealing with it in home waters and in the Mediterranean, and such matters as the provision of mercantile shipping for the use of our Allies. There was, however, no regular council sitting at specified intervals,...
Page ix - ... the end of the year it was becoming apparent that success was assured. The volume describes the changes carried out in the Admiralty Staff organization; the position of affairs in regard to submarine warfare in the early part of 1917 ; and the numerous anti-submarine measures which were devised and brought into operation during the year. The introduction and working of the convoy system is also dealt with.
Page 257 - ... opportunities of studying them. They must be worked out with naval vessels and aircraft acting in close association. With the air service under separate control, financially as well as in an executive and administrative sense, is it certain that the Admiralty will be able to obtain machines and the personnel in the necessary numbers to carry out all the experimental and training work that is essential for efficiency in action?
Page 4 - ... we were steadily incurring, over and above the responsibility of bringing to these shores the greater part of the food for a population of forty-five million people, as well as nearly all the raw materials which were essential for the manufacture of munitions. The whole of our war efforts, ashore B as well as afloat, depended first and last on an adequate volume of merchant shipping. It is small wonder, therefore, that those who watched from day to day the increasing toll which the enemy took...
Page 112 - Simultaneously a careful investigation showed that for the institution of a system of convoy and escort for homeward-bound Atlantic trade alone to the United Kingdom, our requirements would be eighty-one destroyers or sloops and forty-eight trawlers (the latter vessels being only suitable for escorting the slow 6-7-knot ships of the trade from Gibraltar to the United Kingdom). For the outward Atlantic trade from the United Kingdom our estimated requirements were forty-four additional destroyers or...
Page 31 - ... the troops that may happen to be quartered in the same place ; and these are quite ready enough, as it is, to occasionally look with a certain amount of dislike — though in most cases it is entirely uncalled for — on the personnel of the higher staffs. Finally, it should be remembered— and this is the most weighty argument against the proceeding — that idleness is at the root of all mischief. An unnecessarily numerous staff of officers...
Page 31 - Staff of officers, etc., cannot always find duty and occupation sufficient for its mental and physical welfare ; and its superfluous energies soon make themselves felt in every conceivable kind of objectionable way. Experience, at any rate, shows that whenever a Staff is unnecessarily numerous, the ambitious before long take to intrigue, the litigious soon produce general friction, and the vain are never satisfied. These failings, so common to human nature, even if all present, are considerably counteracted,...
Page 258 - War personnel that the success of the enormous expansions needed in war so largely depends. This was found during the late struggle, when the personnel was expanded from 150,000 to upwards of 400,000, throwing upon the pre-war nucleus a heavy responsibility in training, equipment and organizing. Without the backbone of a highly trained personnel of sufficient strength, developments in time of sudden emergency cannot possibly be effected. In the late war we suffered in this respect, and we should...
Page 31 - Staff is unnecessarily numerous, the ambitious before long take to intrigue, the litigious soon produce general friction, and the vain are never satisfied. These failings, so common to human nature, even if all present, are to a great extent counteracted, if the persons to whom they apply have plenty of hard and constant work.

Bibliographic information