The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self Under Colonialism

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Oxford University Press, 1983 - Social Science - 121 pages
6 Reviews
This study contends that modern colonialism is successful not only because the ruling country subjugates through superior technical and economic resources, but also because the rulers propagate cultural subservience of the subject people. Exploring the myths, fantasies and psychological defenses that went into the colonial culture, particularly the polarities that shaped the colonial theory of progress, Nandy describes the Indian experience and shows how the Indians broke with traditional norms of Western culture to protect their vision of an alternative future.

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Review: The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self Under Colonialism

User Review  - Anurag - Goodreads

Even though I don't agree with a lot of things Mr Nandy has said, this is an exceptional account of the Indian colonial experience. It has a lot to say about each one of us who lived in the Indian ... Read full review

Review: The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self Under Colonialism

User Review  - Sneha Yerra - Goodreads

I didn't understand 2/3rds of it. It needs a second reading. But, true.. the book brought out an angle I never ever thought of. I always thought west as liberal ... but, I don't know.. true.. not just ... Read full review

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About the author (1983)

Ashis Nandy is at Smithsonian Institution, Washington.

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