Buried Alive: Or, Ten Years Penal Servitude in Siberia (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1881 - Siberia (Russia) - 361 pages
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Page 1 - ... means of becoming a land of prosperity and freedom. Siberia has no nobility, no peculiarly privileged class, very few officials, and a population which has never been in bondage, and knows how to govern itself. And let me add to this a parting word, a quotation from Dostoefsky's ' Buried Alive : ' In spite of the cold climate, Siberia is a nice snug place to live in, as the people are very simple-minded and conservative ; innovations are abhorred, and things go on much as they did two hundred...
Page 284 - Russian story two prisoners are talking in the night, and one relates: "I had got, somehow or other, in the way of beating her" (his wife). "Some days I would keep at it from morning till night. I did not know what to do with myself when I was not beating her. She used to sit crying, and I could not help feeling sorry for her, and so I beat her.
Page 29 - I began to realise that it was rendered irksome and unbearable through being imposed as a task which had to be finished by a certain time for fear of punishment. Many a poor labourer who is free works perhaps harder than a convict, and even spends sometimes a part of the night working out of doors especially in the summer-time. But he works for himself only; and this thought, and the knowledge that he will profit by his labour, is enough to reward him, while the convict is obliged to work at...
Page 28 - I fully realized what an exceptional and unnatural existence I was to lead henceforth, and I could never make up my mind to bear it patiently. My first impression on entering the prison was a feeling of intense depression ; yet, strange to say, the life of a convict seemed to me less hard than I had pictured it upon the road. The convicts were in chains, but still they were free to go about in the prison, to smoke, to swear at each other, sing whatever songs they liked ; a few even drank brandy,...
Page 41 - ... 1751, Walpole says that he has been at Woburn, where the Duchess of Devonshire borrowed for him from a niece of Lady Mary's a volume containing fifty letters from the latter to Lady Mar. night, armed with a sword and pistol, and declared his passion for her. She was obliged to summon help, and the man was tried and condemned to death, but the sentence was commuted to one of penal servitude. The incident made a great sensation at the time, and Lady Mary wrote a so-called Epistle from Arthur Grey,...
Page 2 - Siberia is a pleasant country to live in ; the climate is excellent, and there are many rich and hospitable merchants and wealthy foreigners scattered about the different towns and settlements. The young ladies bloom like roses, and their morals are excellent. Wild ducks, partridges, and game of all kinds fly about in the streets. In some places the soil brings forth fifteenfold. In short it is a blessed country, but the difficulty is to know how to enjoy it.
Page 311 - The stoat a little devil with all its hair, from the tip of its nose to the end of its tail...
Page 28 - ... what an exceptional and unnatural existence I was to lead henceforth, and I could never make up my mind to bear it patiently. My first impression on entering the prison was a feeling of intense depression ; yet, strange to say, the life of a convict seemed to me less hard than I had pictured it upon the road. The convicts were in chains, but still they were free to go about in the prison, to smoke, to swear at each other, sing whatever songs they liked ; a few even drank brandy, and some had...
Page 28 - The tone of the book he found utterly antagonistic to all experience of convict-life in Britain. For instance, " My First Impressions :" " I distinctly remember being very much struck at first to find that my new life was, after all, not so very different from my old one. I seemed to have known all about it beforehand. When on my way to Siberia I tried to guess what my life would be like. It was not till I had spent some time in the convictprison that I fully...
Page 263 - ... from the loss of blood, he resigned his command for the time being to the executive officer, with clear and positive instructions not to surrender the ship, but rather beach or burn her. In the sick bay I met Ensign Luis Fajardo, who was having a very serious wound in one of his arms dressed. When I asked him what was the matter with him he answered that they had wounded him in one arm, but that he still had one left for his country.

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