A complete history of the great flood at Sheffield on March 11 & 12, 1864 ...: To which are added official lists of the dead and missing ... official returns showing the number of buildings and houses destroyed and injured in each locality (Google eBook)

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S. Harrison, 1864 - Floods - 160 pages
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Page 86 - Ah! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress, And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness; And there were sudden partings, such as press The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs Which ne'er might be repeated...
Page 16 - There take thy stand, my spirit ; spread The world of shadows at thy feet ; And mark how calmly, overhead, The stars like saints in glory meet : While hid in solitude sublime, Methinks I muse on Nature's tomb, And hear the passing foot of Time Step through the gloom.
Page 87 - They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate With dreadful faces thronged and fiery arms. Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
Page 38 - THE Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye ; My noonday walks he shall attend, And all my midnight hours defend.
Page 11 - The town is fortified with an entrenchment, salient angles, and redoubts, which inclose about half a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile in width.
Page 109 - Bradfield reservoir on the 12th inst. ; that, in our opinion, there has not been that engineering skill and that attention to the construction of the works which their magnitude and importance demanded ; that, in our opinion, the Legislature ought to take such action as will result in a Governmental inspection of all works of this character, and that such inspection ought to be frequent, regular, and sufficient ; and that we cannot separate without expressing our deep regret at the fearful loss of...
Page 155 - Sir, I have had the honour to submit to Her Majesty the Queen your letter received last night. Her Majesty had already directed me to make inquiry whether any subscription had been commenced for the relief of the sufferers by the fearful calamity which has occurred near Sheffield. The Queen has commanded me to inform you that it is Her Majesty's intention to contribute 200/. towards the objects advocated in your letter. Her Majesty has commanded me to add the expression of her deep sympathy for...
Page 142 - ... The pipes and by.wash would not carry away a flood coming when the reservoir was full. There ought to be a goit to carry away the flood.water when the dam was full. I am surprised that the engineers destroyed the one they used while the embankment was being made. " By the Coroner. Several causes may have led to the catastrophe, a fractured pipe, a blown or drawn joint, a creep along the pipes, a pressing down of the pipes in the puddle trench by the heavy material on both sides of it...
Page 113 - RS" To the above I received the following reply from Mr. Lee the assistant secretary. " SIR, I am directed by the President of the Royal Society to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, and to inform you that...
Page 139 - ... along every pipe. The result of that experience teaches me that a smooth line of cast.iron pipes, with joints, is not to be trusted as certain to be water.tight in such an embankment, although lined the whole length with puddle. I heard the evidence given as to the mode in which the pipes were laid through the embankment. I expected to learn that the crossing of the puddle trench had been provided for, so as to give a bearing to the pipes uniform with that of the solid ground on either side....

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