Fathers and Sons in Athens: Ideology and Society in the Era of the Peloponnesian War

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Routledge, 1993 - History - 283 pages
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As history's first democracy, classical Athens invited political discourse. The Athenians, however could not completely separate the politicals from the private sphere; indeed father-son conflict, from patricide to murdering one's son, was a major public as well as a private theme. In a fascinating historical reappraisal, the author explores the consequences, for Athens and us, of the powerful influence of familial ideology on politics.

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About the author (1993)

Professor of history and classics at Cornell University, Barry Strauss holds a Ph.D. from Yale. He has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Academy in Rome, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, The MacDowell Colony for the Arts, the Korea Foundation, and the Killam Foundation of Canada. He is the recipient of the Clark Award for excellence in teaching from Cornell. He is Chair of Cornell's Department of History, Director of Cornell's Program on Freedom and Free Societies, and Past Director of Cornell's Peace Studies Program. His many publications include Athens After the Peloponnesian War: Class, Faction, and Policy, 403-386 B.C.; Fathers and Sons in Athens: Ideology and Society in the Era of the Peloponnesian War; The Anatomy of Error: Ancient Military Disasters and Their Lessons for Modern Strategists (with Josiah Ober); Hegemonic Rivalry from Thucydides to the Nuclear Age (coedited with R. New Lebow); War and Democracy: A Comparative Study of the Korean War and the Peloponnesian War (coedited with David R. McCann); Rowing Against the Current: On Learning to Scull at Forty; The Battle of Salamis, the Naval Encounter That Saved Greece-and Western Civilization; The Trojan War: A New History; The Spartacus War; and Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar and the Genius of War. His books have been translated into seven languages. His book The Battle of Salamis was named one of the best books of 2004 by the Washington Post.

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