Faust: A Tragedy : Interpretive Notes, Contexts, Modern Criticism

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W W Norton & Company Incorporated, 2001 - Drama - 737 pages
560 Reviews
Goethe's classic, enlivened by Randall Jarrell's fine translation and Peter Sis's dark, dreamy illustrations Randall Jarrell's translation of "Faust "is one of his most important achievements. In 1957 he inscribed Goethe's motto on the first page of his notebook--"Ohne Hast aber ohne Rast" ("Without haste but without rest")--and from then until his death in 1965 he worked on the masterpiece of his "own favorite daemon, dear good great Goethe." His intent was to make the German poetry free, unrhymed poetry in English. He all but finished the job before he died, and the few lines that remained untouched--"Gretchen's Room"--were rendered into English by Robert Lowell. This elegant new edition features numerous beautiful line drawings and jacket lettering by the renowned Czech artist Peter Sis, author of the award-winning books "Starry Messenger: Galileo Galilei" and "Tibet: Through the Red Box."

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The most beautiful prose I've ever read... - Goodreads
I truly am confused and annoyed by the ending. - Goodreads
Loved it, the rhyming, imagery, wit, gothic scenery. - Goodreads
The ending was pretty good I might admit. - Goodreads
My favorite period of writing. - Goodreads
classic. I advice you to read it in german. - Goodreads

Review: Faust: First Part (Goethe's Faust #1)

User Review  - Alexis Castro - Goodreads

Great !!! Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Goodreads

A good interpretation of the St. John's College reading list. Read full review

About the author (2001)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt am Main. He was greatly influenced by his mother, who encouraged his literary aspirations. After troubles at school, he was taught at home and gained an exceptionally wide education. At the age of 16, Goethe began to study law at Leipzig University from 1765 to 1768, and he also studied drawing with Adam Oeser. After a period of illness, he resumed his studies in Strasbourg from 1770 to 1771. Goethe practiced law in Frankfurt for two years and in Wetzlar for a year. He contributed to the Frankfurter Gelehrte Anzeigen from 1772 to 1773, and in 1774 he published his first novel, self-revelatory Die Leiden des Jungen Werthers. In 1775 he was welcomed by Duke Karl August into the small court of Weimar, where he worked in several governmental offices. He was a council member and member of the war commission, director of roads and services, and managed the financial affairs of the court. Goethe was released from day-to-day governmental duties to concentrate on writing, although he was still general supervisor for arts and sciences, and director of the court theatres. In the 1790s Goethe contributed to Friedrich von Schillerīs journal Die Horen, published Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, and continued his writings on the ideals of arts and literature in his own journal, Propylšen. The first part of his masterwork, Faust, appeared in 1808, and the second part in 1832. Goethe had worked for most of his life on this drama, and was based on Christopher Marlowe's Faust. From 1791 to 1817, Goethe was the director of the court theatres. He advised Duke Carl August on mining and Jena University, which for a short time attracted the most prominent figures in German philosophy. He edited Kunst and Altertum and Zur Naturwissenschaft. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832. He and Duke Schiller are buried together, in a mausoleum in the ducal cemetery.

Walter Arndt is Sherman Fairchild Professor in the Humanties, Emeritus, at Dartmouth College. His translation of Pushkinrsquo;s Eugene Onegin was awarded the Bollingen Prize.

Cyrus Hamlin is Chairman of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Yale University.

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