The British Museum: its history and treasures; a view of the origins of that great institution, sketches of its early benefactors and principal officers, and a survey of the priceless objects preserved within its walls (Google eBook)

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L.C. Page & Company, 1911 - 355 pages
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Page 271 - And Hezekiah king of Judah sent to the king of Assyria to Lachish, saying, "I have offended ; return from me: that which thou puttest on me will I bear.
Page 98 - For physic and farces his equal there scarce is— His farces are physic, his physic a farce is.
Page 300 - There methinks would be enjoyment more than in this march of mind, In the steamship, in the railway, in the thoughts that shake mankind. There the passions cramp'd no longer shall have scope and breathing space: I will take some savage woman, she shall rear my dusky race.
Page 172 - tis haunted, holy ground ; No earth of thine is lost in vulgar mould, But one vast realm of wonder spreads around, And all the Muse's tales seem truly told, Till the sense aches with gazing to behold The scenes our earliest dreams have dwelt upon...
Page 188 - Who are these coming to the sacrifice? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest?
Page 301 - The astonishment which I felt on first seeing a party of Fuegians on a wild and broken shore will never be forgotten by me, for the reflection at once rushed into my mind — such were our ancestors. These men were absolutely naked and bedaubed with paint, their long hair was tangled, their mouths frothed with excitement, and their expression was wild, startled, and distrustful.
Page 137 - It is a very striking circumstance," says Mr. Hallam, " that the high-minded inventors of this great art tried, at the very outset, so bold a flight as the printing of an entire Bible,* and executed it with astonishing success. It was Minerva leaping on earth in her divine strength and radiant armour, ready at the moment of her nativity to subdue and destroy her enemies.
Page 7 - ... generation be content with their internal accommodations. A gentleman's house containing three or four beds was extraordinarily well provided; few probably had more than two. The walls were commonly bare, without wainscot, or even plaster, except that some great houses were furnished with hangings, and that, perhaps, hardly so soon as the reign of Edward IV. It is unnecessary to add that neither libraries of books nor pictures could have found a place among furniture. Silver plate was very rare,...
Page 161 - Other men are known to posterity only through the medium of history, which is continually growing faint and obscure; but the intercourse between the author and his fellowmen is ever new, active and immediate.
Page 157 - MY LORD : — I would not have you take too much physic, for it doth always make me worse, and I think it will do the like with you. I ride every day, and am ready to follow any other directions from you. Make haste to return to him that loves you. CHARLES P.

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