A History of New York: From the Beginning of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty ... (Google eBook)

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Putnam, 1864 - Dutch Americans - 528 pages
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Contents

I
43
II
98
III
169
IV
237
V
301
VI
361
VII
445
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Page 15 - DISTRESSING. Left his lodgings some time since, and has not since been heard of, a small elderly gentleman, dressed in an old black coat and cocked hat, by the name of Knickerbocker. As there are some reasons for believing he is not entirely in his right mind, and as great anxiety is entertained about him, any information concerning him, left either at the Columbian Hotel, Mulberry Street, or at the office of this paper, will be thankfully received.
Page 175 - Amsterdam, and curiously carved about the arms and feet, into exact imitations of gigantic eagle's claws. Instead of a sceptre he swayed a long Turkish pipe, wrought with jasmin and amber, which had been presented to a stadtholder of Holland, at the conclusion of a treaty with one of the petty Barbary powers. In this stately chair would he sit, and this magnificent pipe would he smoke, shaking his right knee with a constant motion, and fixing his eye for hours together upon a little print of Amsterdam,...
Page 175 - Van Twiller — a true philosopher, for his mind was either elevated above, or tranquilly settled below, the cares and perplexities of this world. He had lived in it for years, without feeling the least curiosity to know whether the sun revolved round it, or it round the sun; and he had...
Page 201 - Their petticoats of linseywoolsey were striped with a variety of gorgeous dyes, — though I must confess these gallant garments were rather short, scarce reaching below the knee ; but then they made up in the number...
Page 178 - The sage Wouter took them one after the other, and, having poised them in his hands and attentively counted over the number of leaves, fell straightway into a very great doubt, and smoked for half an hour without saying a word...
Page 197 - The tea was served out of a majestic delft teapot, ornamented with paintings of fat little Dutch shepherds and shepherdesses, tending pigs — with boats sailing in the air, and houses built in the clouds, and sundry other ingenious Dutch fantasies.
Page 195 - ... worn out by the very precautions taken for its preservation. The whole house was constantly in a state of inundation, under the discipline of mops and brooms and scrubbingbrushes ; and the good housewives of those days were a kind of amphibious animal, delighting exceedingly to be dabbling in water, — insomuch that an historian of the day gravely tells us, that many of his townswomen grew to have webbed fingers like unto a duck ; and A COUNTRY MANStON.
Page 370 - Not to spoil their hose. As soon as he rose, To make him strong and mighty, He drank by the tale, six pots of ale, And a quart of aqua-vitae.
Page 196 - As to the family, they always entered in at the gate, and most generally lived in the kitchen. To have seen a numerous household assembled around the fire, one would have imagined that he was transported back to those happy days of primeval simplicity which float before our imaginations like golden visions. The fireplaces were of a truly patriarchal magnitude, where the whole family, old and young, master and servant, black and white...
Page 201 - These, in fact, were convenient receptacles, where all good housewives carefully stored away such things as they wished to have at hand ; by which means they often came to be incredibly crammed — and I remember there was a story current when I was a boy, that the lady of Wouter Van...

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