A pocket encyclopædia, or library of general knowledge (Google eBook)

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Page 171 - ... unless it be in cases of treason, nor to reject one witness because he is single, or always to believe two witnesses, if the probability of the fact does upon other circumstances reasonably encounter them ; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses, but by jury : nay, it may so fall out, that a jury upon their own knowledge may know a thing to be false that a witness swore to be true, or may know a witness to be incompetent or incredible, though nothing be objected against him — and may...
Page 359 - OPTION, in law, every bishop, whether created or translated, is bound immediately after confirmation, to make a legal conveyance to the archbishop, of the next avoidance of such dignity or benefice belonging to the see, as the said archbishop shall choose, which is therefore called an option.
Page 224 - Rut every man, when he enters into society, gives up a part of his natural liberty, as the price of so valuable a purchase...
Page 43 - This is a high prerogative writ, and therefore by the common law issuing out of the court of king's bench not only in term-time, but also during the vacation, by a fiat from the chief justice or any other of the judges, and running into all parts of the king's dominions; for the king is at all times entitled to have an account, why the liberty of any of his subjects is restrained, wherever that restraint may be inflicted.
Page 144 - An indictment is a written accusation of one or more persons of a crime or misdemeanor, preferred to, and presented upon oath by, a grand jury.
Page 171 - I have before said) they are not precisely bound by the rules of the civil law, viz,, to have two witnesses to prove every fact, unless it be in cases of treason, nor to reject one witness because he is single, or always to believe two witnesses, if the probability of the fact does upon other circumstances reasonably encounter them ; for the trial is not here simply by witnesses, but by jury; nay, it may so fall out, that a jury upon their own knowledge may know a thing to be false, that a witness...
Page 172 - This grand jury are previously instructed in the articles of their inquiry, by a charge from the judge who presides upon the bench. They then withdraw, to sit and receive indictments, which are preferred to them in the name of the king, but at the suit of any private prosecutor; and they are only to hear evidence on behalf of the prosecution : for the finding of an indictment is only in the nature of an inquiry or accusation, which is afterwards to be tried and...
Page 51 - ... them is sometimes useful, to make them catch the glass and bring out the tone more readily. Both hands are used, by which means different .parts are played together. — Observe, that the tones are best drawn out when the glasses turn from the ends of the fingers, not when they turn to them.
Page 317 - Every body perseveres in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a right line, unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed thereon.
Page 186 - THE BOUNDARIES WHICH THE CONSTITUTION HAS SET TO THE ROYAL PREROGATIVE. IN reading the foregoing enumeration of the powers with which the laws of England have intrusted the king, we are at a loss to reconcile them with the idea of a monarchy, which, we are told, is limited. The king not...

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