A Jew's Best Friend?: The Image of the Dog Throughout Jewish History

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Phillip Ackerman-Lieberman, Rakefet Zalashik
Apollo Books, 2013 - Social Science - 240 pages
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A discussion on the specific cultural manifestations of the relationship between dogs and Jews, from ancient times to the present, this work covers a geographical range extending from the Middle East through Europe and to North America, while the contributors—all of whom are senior university scholars specializing in various disciplines—provide a unique cross-cultural, trans-national, diachronic perspective. An important theme is the constant tension between domination/control and partnership that underpins the relationship of humans to animals, as well as the connection between Jewish societies and their broader host cultures. A public increasingly interested in cultural history in general and Jewish history in particular will benefit from the diverse perspectives provided herein.

  

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Contents

Chapter
12
Chapter
36
Chapter Three
52
Chapter Four
90
The Bread the Children and the Dogs
113
Chapter
135
Chapter Seven
147
Chapter Nine
179
Chapter
207
Chapter Eleven
231
Chapter Twelve
251
The Contributors
278
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Phillip Ackerman-Lieberman is an assistant professor in the program in Jewish studies at Vanderbilt University. An expert in Jewish and Islamic law, his most recent work has been as section editor for the Encyclopedia of Jews in the Islamic World. Rakefet Zalashik is a visiting fellow in the Corcoran department of history at the University of Virginia, as well as Württemberg guest chair in Israel, and near Eastern studies at the University of Heidelberg.

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