The Edinburgh Journal of Science (Google eBook)

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William Blackwood, 1830 - Science
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Page 218 - Why don't you speak ?" The figure immediately moved off towards the window at the farther end of the room, with its eyes still gazing on her, and it passed so very close to her in doing so, that she was struck by the circumstance of hearing no step nor sound, nor feeling her clothes brushed against, nor even any agitation in the air. Although she was now convinced that the figure was not her husband, yet she never for a moment supposed that it was any thing supernatural, and was soon convinced that...
Page 88 - Ille, olim populis dictum Styga, nomine verso, Stagna inter celebrem nunc mitia monstrat Avernum. Popular superstition might well fix upon this spot, surrounded by volcanos, and supposed to be of unfathomable depth, as the entrance to the infernal regions; and, perhaps, Homer did but follow the real belief of his time in sending Ulysses thither. " Hence Virgil, attentive to every local superstition...
Page 263 - But the sehrab and chittram, the true mirage of Isaiah, differ from that illusion called the see-kote ; and though the traveller will hasten to it, in order to obtain a night's lodging, I do not think he would expect to slake his thirst there. When we witnessed this phenomenon at first, the eye was attracted by a lofty opaque wall of lurid smoke, which seemed to be bounded by, or to rise from, the very verge of the horizon. By slow degrees, the dense mass became more transparent, and assumed a reflecting...
Page 70 - Sillet, and during the latter part of that long period a zealous contributor to the Honourable Company's botanic garden at Calcutta, furnished some very curious information concerning our tree to Mr. H. Colebrooke, then in charge of that institution. He must therefore be considered as the first person who brought this valuable tree into notice, although he failed in his endeavours to procure either dried specimens or fresh seeds of it. I shall here subjoin some of his remarks. ' I have discovered...
Page 72 - I was told, to the poverty of the soil, and partly also to the circumstance of there being none of the people in that part whose business it is to perform the process. This latter is very simple : short joints of a thin sort of bamboo, sharpened at one end like a writing-pen, and shut up at the other, are inserted in a slanting direction into...
Page 355 - In the present state of society it is most desirable that stability and economy should characterise the different species of construction. A just economy of materials should be one of the first objects of the builder's attention, and this desirable object is to be obtained only by judicious combinations of the materials to be used...
Page 70 - There it attains its greatest size, some, and those not the largest, having clear stems of 42 feet to the first branch, with a circumference near the ground of 13 feet. It forms extensive forests, and is associated with the two staple timber-trees of continental India, Teak and Saul...
Page 373 - ... children accompanies the description, but it is too imperfect to afford any additional elucidation. The children were females, and born at a village in Coimbatore, in the month of October 1804. At the period of examination, October 1807, they were, of course, three years old. One of them was thirty-four inches high, the other a quarter of an inch shorter. The heads of both were rather long, and the sides of each head much compressed ; the features of each strongly resembled the other. The bodies...
Page 217 - December 1830, about half-past four in the afternoon, she was standing near the fire in the hall, and on the point of going up stairs to dress, when she heard, as she supposed, her husband's voice calling her by name,

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