The Early Spanish Main

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 30, 2008 - History - 320 pages
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What happened from 1942 to 1519, when Columbus and the Spaniards were staking out an American Empire? Carl O. Sauer uses contemporary sources and his authoritative knowledge of land forms, vegetation and ethnography in Latin America to place the history of the early Spanish Main in a fresh context. This account of the voyages of discovery, of the early years of Spanish administration, and how the Spaniards dealt with the crises of their colonial policies, is a definitive work of historical geography as well as an exciting readable book.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Discovery
12
Aboriginal Condition of the Islands
37
Espanola under Columbus
70
Change of Government License to Discover 14991502
104
Veragua Last Venture of Columbus 15021504
120
Organization of the Indies 15021509
147
Attempts to Occupy Tierra Firme 15041509
161
Entry to Darien and the South Sea 15111514
218
Cuevan Country and People
238
Castilla del Oro 15141519
247
Indian Lands of Farther Castilla del Oro
266
Establishment on the South Sea
278
Native Decline and Ecologic Change in Castilla del Oro
283
The End of the Era
290
Index
297

Expansion from Espanola 15091519
178
Island Crisis and Its Effects 15091519
196

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About the author (2008)

Carl Ortwin Sauer (1889-1975), until his death, taught at the University of California, Berkeley, where he trained an entire generation of geographers and founded the Berkeley school of cultural geography. Anthony Pagden is a fellow of King's College, Cambridge University.

Carl Ortwin Sauer (1889-1975), until his death, taught at the University of California, Berkeley, where he trained an entire generation of geographers and founded the Berkeley school of cultural geography. Anthony Pagden is a fellow of King's College, Cambridge University.

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