The history of England: from the invasion of Julius Csar, to the revolution in 1688, Volume 13 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Inskeep & Bradford, 1811 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 478 - India, shall not assign, mortgage, or pledge any territory or land whatsoever, or the produce or revenue thereof, to any British...
Page 185 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy! Pressed down as I am by the hand of infirmity, I am little able to assist my country in this most perilous conjuncture; but, my Lords, while I have sense and memory, I will never consent to deprive the royal offspring of the House of Brunswick, the heirs of the Princess Sophia, of their fairest inheritance.
Page 185 - I never will consent to tarnish the lustre of this nation by an ignominious surrender of its rights and fairest possessions. Shall a people so lately the terror of the world, now fall prostrate before the House of Bourbon?
Page 487 - That it is now necessary to declare, that, to report any opinion, or pretended opinion, of his Majesty upon any bill, or other proceeding, depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the constitution of this country...
Page 210 - Burgoyne, and the troops under his command, should be suspended until a distinct and explicit ratification of the convention of Saratoga should be properly notified by the court of Great Britain to congress.
Page 324 - Government, or to remove evil counsellors round about him, these risings all amount to levying war within the statute ; whether attended with the pomp and circumstances of open war or not. And every conspiracy to levy war for these purposes, though not treason within the clause of levying war, is yet an overt act within the other clause of compassing the King,s death. For these purposes cannot be effected by numbers and open force without manifest danger to his person.
Page 453 - I have sacrificed every consideration of my own, to the wishes and opinion of my people. I make it my humble and earnest prayer to Almighty God, that Great Britain may not feel the evils which might result from so great a dismemberment of the empire ; and, that America may be free from those calamities, which have formerly proved in the mother country how essential monarchy is to the enjoyment of constitutional liberty. Religion language- interest affections may, and I hope will yet prove...
Page 391 - America, for the purpose of reducing the revolted colonies to obedience by force, will be the means of weakening the efforts of this country against her European enemies; tends, under the present circumstances, dangerously to increase the mutual enmity, so fatal to the interests both of Great Britain and America ; and by preventing an happy reconciliation with that country, to frustrate the earnest desire, graciously expressed by his majesty, to restore the blessings of public tranquillity.
Page 397 - British legislature, and concluded with moving for leave to bring in a bill to repeal so much of the act of the 6th of George I.
Page 285 - Warn them of the hazard of innovation ; point out to them the fatal consequences of such commotions as have lately been excited ; and let it be your care to impress on their minds this important truth, that rebellious insurrections to resist, or to reform the laws, must end either in the destruction of the persons who make the attempt, or in the subversion of our free and happy constitution.

Bibliographic information