Television and the Quality of Life: How Viewing Shapes Everyday Experience

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L. Erlbaum Associates, 1990 - Performing Arts - 287 pages
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Employing a unique research methodology that enables people to report on their normal activities as they occur, the authors examine how people actually use and experience television -- and how television viewing both contributes to and detracts from the quality of everyday life. Studied within the natural context of everyday living, and drawing comparisons between television viewing and a variety of other daily activities and leisure pursuits, this unusual book explores whether television is a boon or a detriment to family life; how people feel and think before, during, and after television viewing; what causes television habits to develop; and what causes heavy viewing -- and what heavy viewing causes -- in the short and long term.

Television and the Quality of Life also compares the viewing experience cross-nationally using samples from the United States, Italy, Canada, and Germany -- and then interprets the findings within a broad theoretical and historical framework that considers how information use and daily activity contribute to individual, familial, societal, and cultural development.

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About the author (1990)

Robert Kubey is professor of communication, the School of Communication, Information, and Library Studies at Rutgers University. Brent D. Ruben is the winner of the National Communication Association's Gerald M. Phillips Award for Distinguished Applied Communication Scholarship.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is a professor at Claremont Graduate University and former chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of Chicago. His previous books include The Evolving Self and the national bestseller Flow.