Bloodline

Front Cover
Vintage Contemporaries, 1968 - Fiction - 249 pages
10 Reviews
In these five stories, Gaines returns to the cane fields, sharecroppers' shacks, and decaying plantation houses of Louisiana, the terrain of his great novels A Gathering of Old Men and A Lesson Before Dying. As rendered by Gaines, this country becomes as familiar, and as haunted by cruelty, suffering, and courage, as Ralph Ellison's Harlem or Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County.

STORIES INCLUDE:

A Long Day in November

The Sky Is Gray

Three Men

Bloodline

Just Like a Tree

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
5
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Bloodline: Five Stories

User Review  - Irene - Goodreads

This is a collection of 5 short stories all set among share croppers in the segregated deep south. Each is so emotionally charged with tenderness, pain, genuine love and longing that I was a bit breathless after each. Read full review

Review: Bloodline: Five Stories

User Review  - Maureen - Goodreads

This is not light reading though there are touches of humor in the stories. I'm not a great lover of short stories but these are well worth it. Other reviewers have said it all. Read full review

Contents

A Long Day in November
1
The Sky Is Gray
81
Three Men
119
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1968)

Ernest James Gaines was born on January 15, 1933, on the River Lake Plantation, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana. His 1993 novel, A Lesson Before Dying, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. Gaines has been a MacArthur Foundation fellow, awarded the National Humanities Medal, and inducted into the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Letters) as a Chevalier. Although he was educated in California (at San Francisco State College and Stanford University), his fiction is dominated by images and characters drawn from rural Louisiana, where he was born and raised. Unquestionably the most recognizable, and probably the best, of Gaines's novels is The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971), a fictional account of the long life of a black woman born a slave on a Louisiana plantation. Through the stories of the many fascinating people who touch Jane's life, Gaines presents not only a moving perspective on the struggles of African Americans but also a social history of the United States since the Civil War. It is a testimony to Gaines's skill as a writer and storyteller that many people believe Jane Pittman was a real person. Indeed, the novel is frequently misshelved in the biography section of bookstores. In 1993 Gaines also won the Dos Passos Prize and in 2000 he won the National Humanities Medal. Of Gaines's other works, Bloodline (1976), a collection of five short stories, stands out for its powerful portrayals of young men in search of self-respect and dignity.

Bibliographic information