Memory: From Mind to Molecules

Front Cover
Macmillan, May 15, 2000 - Psychology - 254 pages
3 Reviews
What is memory and where in the brain is it stored? How is memory storage accomplished? Two scientists responsible for some of the fundamental research in the field answer these key questions in Memory: From Mind to Molecules, the first book for a general readership to offer an up-to-date, comprehensive overview of memory from molecules and cells to brain systems and cognition.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Memory: From Mind to Molecules

User Review  - Nirvanafish - Goodreads

very clear defined memory processes Read full review

Review: Memory: From Mind to Molecules

User Review  - Dianne Lange - Goodreads

A textbook really, but written so well that some smart publisher should reissue it--with some editing--for anyone interested in how the brain stores memories and how we learn. Read full review

Contents

From Mind to Molecules
1
Modifiable Synapses for Nondeclarative Memory
23
Molecules for ShortTerm Memory
47
Declarative Memory
69
Brain Systems for Declarative Memory
83
A Synaptic Storage Mechanism for Declarative Memory
109
From ShortTerm Memory to LongTerm Memory
129
Priming Perceptual Learning and Emotional Learning
157
Memory for Skills Habits and Conditioning
175
Memory and the Biological Basis of Individuality
195
Further Readings
217
Sources of Illustrations
219
Index
225
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Larry R. Squire, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry, neurosciences, and psychology at the University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, and Research Career Scientist at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego. The author of Memory and Brain, he has received many awards, including the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association and the Karl Lashey Prize from the American Philosophical Society.

Eric R. Kandel, M.D., founded the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior at Columbia University in New York, where he is currently University Professor and Senior Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Laboratories. The coauthor of Principles of Neural Science, he has won many prestigious awards, including the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, the National Medal of Science, and the Wolf Prize in Biology and Medicine.

Bibliographic information