Building in France, building in iron, building in ferroconcrete

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Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, 1995 - Architecture - 237 pages
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This classic of twentieth-century architectural literature, now available in English for the first time, presents Sigfried Giedion's provocative vision of architecture in the industrial era and his response to technological advances in the production of key building materials.

Giedion shows how iron and reinforced concrete allowed the construction of buildings of unprecedented size and openness in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Focusing on the radical possibilities of skeletal support structures, he celebrates innovative uses of these materials in buildings from the Eiffel Tower and the Crystal Palace to glass-canopied railroad stations, department stores, and exhibition halls.

With this volume, first published in 1928, Giedion became a leading advocate of modern architecture. He was the first to exalt Le Corbusier as the champion of the new style, at the expense of a considerable body of Germanic theory and practice, and his arguments strongly influenced the direction of architecture for the next four decades. Later, although diluting his criticism of architectual thought in previous periods, Giedion incorporated much of this text into Space, Time, and Architecture, his best-known work.

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Contents

SIGFRIED GIEDION
50
BUILDING IN FRANCE BUILDING IN IRON BUILDING IN FERROCONCRETE
79
INTRODUCTION 85100
85
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Sigfried Giedion was the first secretary-general of the International Congress of Modern Architecture. He taught at the University of Zurich, MIT, and Harvard, where he became chairman of the Graduate School of Design.

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