An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States

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Courier Corporation, May 20, 2004 - History - 330 pages
23 Reviews
This famous study one of the most influential in the area of American economic history brought a halt to Americans' uncritical reverence for their country's revolutionary past. Questioning the Founding Fathers' motivations in drafting the Constitution, it viewed the results as a product of economic self-interest. Perhaps the most controversial books of its time.
  

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Review: An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States

User Review  - C. Scott - Goodreads

Scholarly writing is very difficult for me to get through, but I was very happy that I forced myself to plow through this volume. Beard's message is as important now as it was when it was written 100 ... Read full review

Review: An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

famous text, this, regarding the economic interests that controlled the drafting of the constitution. preface by modern scholar attempts to throw author's argument under the bus. although it may be ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION IN THE UNITED STATES
1
A SURVEY OF ECONOMIC INTERESTS IN 1787
19
THE MOVEMENT FOR THE CONSTITUTION
52
PROPERTY SAFEGUARDS IN THE ELECTION OF DELEGATES
64
THE ECONOMIC INTERESTS OF THE MEMBERS OF THE CONVENTION
73
THE CONSTITUTION AS AN ECONOMIC DOCUMENT
152
THE POLITICAL DOCTRINES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE CONVENTION
189
THE PROCESS OF RATIFICATION
217
THE POPULAR VOTE ON THE CONSTITUTION
239
THE ECONOMICS OF THE VOTE ON THE CONSTITUTION
253
THE ECONOMIC CONFLICT OVER RATIFICATION AS VIEWED BY CONTEMPORARIES
292
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About the author (2004)

Indiana-born Charles A. Beard studied at Oxford, Cornell, and Columbia universities, where he taught history and politics for more than a decade. One of the founders of the New School for Social Research, he also served as director of the Training School for Public Service in New York. A political scientist whose histories were always written from an economic perspective, Beard was an authority on U.S. politics and government. Yet his great survey history, The Rise of American Civilization, published in 1927, deals with the whole range of human experience-war, imperialism, literature, art, music, religion, the sciences, the press, and women-as well as politics and economics. Collaborating with Beard on this and other books was his wife, Mary Ritter Beard. Charles Beard described their coauthorship as a "division of argument." An able historian in her own right, Mary Ritter Beard took a special interest in the labor movement and feminism, subjects on which she produced several works. The Beards's books are scholarly, well written, and often witty, though sometimes a bit ponderous. Yet they stand the test of time well. Some critics agree that their Basic History can be considered the best one-volume history that has ever been written about the United States.

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