Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, 2003 - Business & Economics - 292 pages
55 Reviews
Veteran copywriter Luke Sullivan returns with an updated edition of his irreverent warts-and-all look at the advertising industry. Part how-to book and part exposé, Hey Whipple, Squeeze This is both an insider's guide to writing great ads and an unapologetic send up of all that's heavy-handed, dim-witted, and ineffectual in the industry.

Updated to include the latest campaigns, this edition presents a real-world look at the day-to-day operations of today's ad agencies and examines the good, the bad, and the downright ugly ads the industry produces. Sullivan provides pointers, tips, and guidelines on how to write and produce ads for print, TV, radio, billboards, and more, while regaling you with hilarious war stories.

PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION:

"Luke Sullivan writes just about as relevant an advertising read as you can get. It's a perfect lesson in advertising for newcomers—and a familiar and laughably painful reminiscence for those of us entrenched in this noble and often crazy profession."
—Lee Clow, Chairman, TBWA\Chiat\Day, Chief Creative Officer, Worldwide

"Luke Sullivan knows the business and writes about it with . . . gentle wit and insight."
—Dan G. Wieden, Wieden & Kennedy

"The most informative and entertaining book about life as it really is in the creative department of an advertising agency. Even account men could write great ads after reading it."
—Tim Delaney, Leagas-Delaney, London

"In an advertising world filled with glib, fast-talking 'experts' more adept at arranging lunch than writing ads, Luke Sullivan is the exception. Here, at last, is a step-by-step primer for anyone interested in writing effective, powerful, breakthrough ads."
—Tom McElligott, cofounder, Fallon McElligott

  

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Full of great, timeless advice. - Goodreads
Great anecdotes, great writing style. - Goodreads
Funny insights and hilarious old ads. - Goodreads
The writing doesn't have linear flow. - Goodreads

Review: Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Definitely better as a reference book than a one-shot read. The writing doesn't have linear flow. Instead, the book is broken into hundreds of paragraphs with creative or descriptive headings. These ... Read full review

Review: Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads

User Review  - Andy - Goodreads

Some interesting, informative, and fun anecdotes about advertising, but you can tell from the writing style that Sullivan is an ad man. He seems to be allergic to sentences that use more than a dozen or so words. Somewhat off-putting after a while. Read full review

Contents

Salesmen Dont Have to Wear Plaid Selling without selling out
1
A Sharp Pencil Works Best Some thoughts on getting started
17
A Clean Sheet of Paper Making an adthe broad strokes
35
Write When You Get Work Making an adsome finer touches
81
In the Future Everyone Will Be Famous for 30 Seconds Some advice on making television commercials
117
Radio Is Hell but Its a Dry Heat Some advice on working in a tough medium
143
Toto I Have a Feeling Were Not in McCannErickson Anymore Working out past the edge
165
Only the Good Die Young The enemies of advertising
171
A Good Book or a Crowbar Some thoughts on getting into the business
235
Making Shoes versus Making Shoe Commercials Is this a great business or what?
261
SUGGESTED READING
269
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
277
NOTES
279
AD CREDITS
283
INDEX
287
Copyright

Pecked to Death by Ducks Presenting and protecting your work
199

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

LUKE SULLIVAN is an award-winning copywriter with over twenty years in the business at some of the elite agencies in America–Fallon McElligott and The Martin Agency. Twice named by Adweek as one of the top advertising writers in the country, Sullivan has some twenty medals to his credit in the prestigious One Show, the Oscars of the ad business.

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