Public Policy and the Black Hospital: From Slavery to Segregation to Integration (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1994 - History - 152 pages
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This study adds to the small but growing literature on Black health history--the rise of hospital care and hospital services provided to Blacks from the antebellum era to the integration era, a period of some 150 years. The work examines the political, policy, legal, and philanthropic forces that helped to define the rise, development, and decline of Black hospitals in the United States. Particular discussion is given to the federal Hill-Burton Act of 1946 and the extent to which the legislation impacted Black hospital development. The roles of the Freedman's Bureau, National Medical Association, National Hospital Association, and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in the development of Black hospitals is highlighted.
  

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Contents

BLACK HOSPITAL CARE FROM THE PLANTATION ERA THROUGH POSTRECONSTRUCTION
1
THE BLACK HOSPITAL MOVEMENT THE NEED FOR HOSPITALS TRAINING CLINICS AND MEDICAL SCHOOLS
15
DESCRIPTIONS OF SELECTED BLACK HOSPITALS
47
THE HILLBURTON ACT AND BLACK HOSPITALS
73
THE DECLINE OF THE BLACK HOSPITAL AND CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC POLICY
101
Appendix Black Hospitals in the United States
115
Selected Bibliography
129
Index
149
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

MITCHELL F. RICE is Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at Louisiana State University.WOODROW JONES, JR. is Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University. Together, they edited Contemporary Public Policy Perspectives and Black Americans (Greenwood, 1984), in addition to other works.

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