Bockshammer: On the Freedom of the Human Will (Google eBook)

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Gould and Newman, 1835 - Free will and determinism - 199 pages
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Page 48 - ... that are not contained in the nature and intrinsical quality of the agent, as for example, the water is said to descend freely, or to have- liberty to descend by the channel of the river, because there is no impediment that way, but not across, because the banks are impediments, and though the water cannot ascend, yet men never say it wants the liberty to ascend, but the faculty or power, because the impediment is in the nature of the water, and intrinsical.
Page 54 - For man doth not seem to rest satisfied, either with fruition of that wherewith his life is preserved, or with performance of such actions as advance him most deservedly in estimation; but doth further covet, yea, oftentimes manifestly pursue with great sedulity and earnestness, that which cannot stand him in any stead for vital use; that which exceedeth the reach of sense; yea, somewhat above capacity of Reason, somewhat divine and heavenly, which with hidden exultation it rather surmiseth than...
Page 22 - There is a philosophic (and inasmuch as it is actualized by an effort of freedom, an artificial) consciousness, which lies beneath or (as it were) behind the spontaneous consciousness natural to all reflecting beings.
Page 171 - Idealogie), a word which could only properly suggest an a priori scheme, deducing our knowledge from the intellect, has in France become the name peculiarly distinctive of that philosophy of mind which exclusively derives our knowledge from the senses...
Page 43 - Having thus explained what I mean by Cause, I assert that nothing ever comes to pass without a Cause. What is self-existent must be from eternity, and must be unchangeable: but as to all things that begin to be, they are not self-existent, and therefore must have some foundation of their existence without themselves.
Page 42 - The word nature has been used in two senses, viz., actively and passively ; energetic (= forma formans), and material (= forma formata). In the first it signifies the inward principle of whatever is requisite for the reality of a thing...
Page 179 - Affections, as joy, and grief, and fear, and anger, with such like, being as it were the sundry fashions and forms of Appetite, can neither rise at the conceit of a thing indifferent, nor yet choose but rise at the sight of some things.
Page 54 - ... pursue with great sedulity and earnestness, that which cannot stand him in any stead for vital use; that which exceedeth the reach of sense; yea, somewhat above capacity of Reason, somewhat divine and heavenly, which with hidden exultation it rather surmiseth than conceiveth; somewhat it seeketh, and what that is directly it knoweth not; yet very intentive desire thereof doth so incite it, that all other known delights and pleasures are laid aside, they give place to the search of this but only...
Page 21 - understanding," I mean the faculty of thinking and forming judgments on the notices furnished by the sense, according to certain rules existing in itself, which rules constitute its distinct nature. By the pure
Page 28 - Man in perfection of nature being made according to the likeness of his Maker resembleth him also in the manner of working : so that whatsoever we work as men, the same we do...

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